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A MULTI-STOP TOURING ROUTE THROUGH THE CULTURAL AND HISTORIC HEART OF A NATION

Experience England's history and culture up close with our interactive tool. Uncover hidden gems and attractions off the beaten track, selecting your own itinerary and creating your very own journey - a trip unlike any other.


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The Explorer's Road:

Berwick

Few settlements have been fought over more down the centuries than Berwick-upon-Tweed, the last English town before the Scottish border and a strategic spot at the end of The Explorer’s Road. All is peaceful now, but this fine market town still attracts much attention.

The first thing you notice about Berwick are the walls – thick Tudor ramparts encircling the town, built in the 15th century to keep the Scottish from invading, again. Originally a small market town with modest boat-building and salmon-fishing industries, Berwick has put up with a lot of turbulence over the years, having been sacked or captured 13 times before it was finally claimed by the English in 1482. Despite this English victory, though, the stoic town remained an independent borough, neither fully in Scotland nor England, until 1836.

The Explorer's Road:

Alnwick

Take The Explorer’s Road and you’ll end up in some extraordinary places, but Hogwarts might be one you didn’t anticipate. The Harry Potter films were shot at Alnwick Castle, a fortification that stands guard over the eponymous Northumberland town, but there’s more to this destination than its star turn.

Of course, nobody comes to Alnwick (pronounced like ‘panic’) without taking a look behind its castle walls. It’s impossible to ignore this vast motte-and-bailey castle, home to the Percy family and Dukes of Northumberland since 1309. The 12th Duke of Northumberland still lives here in one of the towers, but you can visit pretty much everything else, including the courtyards, special exhibitions and elegant state rooms, frozen in time as if its inhabitants – real or wizarding – have just gone for a walk.

The Explorer's Road:

Newcastle

The many modern charms of Newcastle upon Tyne and its cross-river neighbour, Gateshead, attract crowds of shoppers and nightlife-seekers all year round. But it’s the history, visible everywhere, from the grandest Neoclassical monuments to the individual cobblestones on Newcastle’s winding medieval streets, that ensures the area’s enduring popularity with visitors.

You could describe this part of the world as a living museum, but that would be to deny the more recent buildings and developments that add to its rich architectural fabric. It would also downplay the vibrant and inimitable spirit of Geordies, as people from Newcastle and Gateshead are known. You can see it in the puckered cheeks of chilly traders in 19th-century Grainger Market, where a plaque commemorates the site of the stall that grew into one of England’s most famous stores, Marks & Spencer. And it’s there in the groups of people, of all ages, that fill the streets and pubs at night, stoically eschewing coats even in the chilliest weather. There’s a hardiness, paired with a hearty love of life, that brings the myriad components of Newcastle and Gateshead together into a captivating whole.

The Explorer's Road:

Bishop Auckland

They call Bishop Auckland the ‘Gateway to Weardale’, thanks to its transport links and privileged surroundings in the Vale of Durham; patchwork fields, wooded valleys and sheep-grazed hillsides in every direction. Yet this bustling market town, where independent shops line roads first laid by the Romans, and centuries-old buildings neighbour dynamic modern landmarks, deserves attention in its own right.

Often simply called ‘Bishop’ by locals, the town sprawls in a triangle on a natural ridge above the River Wear. The town hall is one of its most important buildings, its warm, honey-hued stone cutting a subtle, elegant figure in Market Square, a popular meeting spot. Built in 1862, the hall has become a dynamic social and cultural hub, with a library, cinema, theatre and arts complex. Spend some time browsing the exhibitions here before heading onto Fore Bondgate, a street made for pottering. While Newgate Street has rows of familiar stores, you’ll find this cobbled route is crammed with local ‘Bishop’ charm.

The Explorer's Road:

Barnard Castle

There are no wrong turns, and no poor views, in Barnard Castle, a most enchanting market town, carved within the beautiful Durham Dales. From eclectic independent stores to castle ruins and walks by the River Tees, getting lost here in ‘Barney’ – as the locals call it – is an absolute delight.

Turn one way and you might find yourself meandering down a gentle slope flanked by boutiques, antiques stores and art studios, ending at the broad, chocolatey waters of the Tees. Another manoeuvre could take you into the grounds of the castle for which the town is named, and which rises magnificently just steps from the centre.

The Explorer's Road:

Darlington

This busy market town is the principal transport hub of the Tees Valley. It’s also a shining example of how modernity and history can blend with beautiful results. Independent stores line medieval streets, arts hubs dot the town centre, and lively markets are watched over by a statue of a 19th-century railway pioneer.

The bronze likeness of Joseph Pease is one of Darlington’s most recognisable landmarks, and a good spot to get your bearings and prepare to journey through more than a millennium of heritage. In fact, you could start with Pease himself. A prominent member of the Quaker faith, followers of which once formed an influential community in the town, it was Pease who suggested steam locomotives could be a more efficient and lucrative way to transport coal than building a canal.

He also dissuaded the engineer George Stephenson, employed to design the locomotives, from altering the planned railway route to bypass Darlington. Thus, the Stockton and Darlington Railway was opened in September 1825, and the town’s reputation as the ‘Cradle of the Railways’ was cemented. It still revels in its role; you can, too, at the Head of Steam. Stephenson’s Locomotion No. 1 – which hauled the first public passenger train – is the gleaming highlight of this attraction in the original North Road passenger station.

Glance over Pease’s burnished shoulder to admire the old Backhouse Bank, rendered in pale limestone. The building, dating from 1864, was one of the first locations for the company that would later be renamed Barclays. Follow the statue’s gaze and stroll down the broad, split-level main street, High Row, to reach the Gothic clock tower – another reliable reference point in the town centre. This particular landmark keeps time over the old town hall, built by the architect Alfred Waterhouse, who also designed the Natural History Museum in London. Tucked below – behind forest-green porticoes and brick-red storefronts – is a traditional indoor market with butchers, fishmongers and greengrocers. It spills out onto Market Place and down High Row on Mondays and Saturdays.

Darlington’s busy shopping scene is nothing new. In fact, the outdoor market is believed to date back to the 12th century; the town was designated one of the ‘Bishop’s Boroughs’, giving it permission to hold markets. Today’s incarnation has been held on the same days of the week for more than 400 years. Yet, one reason for Darlington’s enduring appeal is its stubborn refusal to stay still. This spirit can be seen in the retail offerings, too. There are shopping centres, of course, and high-street names. There’s also a refreshing number of independent businesses that add to, and testify to, the town’s distinctive character. High Row is dissected by skinny passages that lead to small squares with wine shops and tiny jewellery stores. Potter down Blackwellgate, where boutiques, record shops and vintage clothing stores sit alongside trendy cafés serving craft coffee. It forms part of the Imperial Quarter, officially launched in late 2018 as a nod to the area’s thriving community on independent, artisanal stores and eateries – many of them clustered along Grange Road.

No, this isn’t a town to rest on its laurels – impressive laurels though they may be. Darlington began as an Anglo-Saxon settlement on the River Skerne, a northern tributary to the Tees. And progress has flowed fast and steady as that gently curving river ever since. The medieval road layout, 17th-century homes and important religious buildings predate the dawn of the railways. Built in 1183, St Cuthbert’s Church – admiringly called ‘Lady of the North’ – is one of the country’s most important early churches.

The building has been impeccably well-preserved, as have other important architectural landmarks. The Darlington Hippodrome, formerly known as the Darlington Civic Theatre, reopened in 2017 after being painstakingly and lovingly restored; the Edwardian venue has once again become an entertainment centre, with stand-up comedy, theatre, music and book readings. Even if you don’t catch a show, pop in for a peek, and perhaps a cream bun and cuppa in the bright, modern café. Next door, the children’s theatre, The Hullabaloo (the only dedicated children’s theatre north of London) puts on plays and music for young eyes and ears.

Both venues have proved hugely popular; but then, Darlington is a creative community, bolstered by venues such as Crown Street Gallery and The Bridge Centre for Visual Arts, which display works by local and regional artists. Pubs, bars and cafés happily host local bands and singers. The Forum Music Centre is a recording studio, gig venue and cinema all in one.

Stroll down tree-hemmed Victoria Embankment to reach vast South Park – another place to hear music in summer, when it hosts free concerts. You could easily lose an afternoon here, just wandering around the broad paths, past the lake with its islands, admiring the ornate bandstand, and craning your neck at the towering, multi-stemmed giant redwoods. This proud, well-kept green space was the first Victorian park in the North East of England when it opened in 1853, popping yet another feather in Darlington’s well-decorated cap.

Public art installations brighten the most unlikely places, reached via a short, winding path, the ‘Brick Train’, created in 1997 by David Mach, recreates a steam train with red bricks forming a puffy trail. Formed from 185,000 bricks and shaped in the image of the Mallard, the installation sits parallel to the original track-bed of the Stockton-Darlington railway and the birthplace of passenger rail travel.

Just outside the centre, Westpark Nature Reserve covers 121,000sq m with wetlands, wildflower meadows and a series of striking sculptures firmly rooted in the region; materials include locally sourced steel and stone from Teesside quarries, while all the structures are inspired by the park’s resident water voles, dingy skipper butterflies and little ringer plovers.

It all adds to the invigorating buzz of fresh life that reverberates through the town. The spring and summer months are particularly vibrant, with food, jazz, rhythm and blues and heritage festivals taking over the centre. July’s Festival of Ingenuity is perhaps the most anticipated. Like all the best elements of Darlington, it pays homage to the town’s illustrious industrial past, yet with one eye always cast towards the future.

The Explorer's Road:

Richmond

It’s said there are 50 or more other Richmonds around the world, but this northern gateway to the Yorkshire Dales is the original. Set on the banks of the River Swale, its Georgian facades clustered around a commanding Norman castle, you’ll soon see why this town has provided inspiration for artists down the years.

Founded by the Normans as a stronghold from which to subdue the unruly northern hordes, Richmond was soon granted Royal charters to host fairs and markets, and the clamour of people from the surrounding area quickly turned it into a medieval powerhouse. Trade brought much of the town’s early riches and when you stand in its sprawling, cobbled marketplace today, by the towering 1771 obelisk that replaced the ancient market cross, you’ll find it easy to conjure up the scene of its heyday: the vast space thronged with people bartering over goods raised or grown on the surrounding fertile land.

The Explorer's Road:

York

George VI once declared: ‘The history of York is the history of England.’ For in this city, where the Romans, Vikings, Normans and Tudors all made their marks, you can trace the timeline of Christian Britain. And while history is evident at every turn, York, with its great shopping and entertainment scene, has a very modern feel, too.

Founded by the Romans in AD74 as a stopping point on the journey north from London and at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss, York is visibly defined by this heritage. Many of the original defences provided the foundations for the almost perfectly preserved medieval walls that today confine the city centre into one that you will find easy to navigate and eminently walkable, with all the major sights a short distance from each other.

The Explorer's Road:

Selby

Selby punches well above its weight when it comes to English market towns. Home to a Norman Abbey, once-thriving shipbuilding and coal-mining industries, as well as Yorkshire’s first railway station, Selby has also stayed true to its roots as a vital trading place for the surrounding area.

Begin your explorations at Selby Abbey, the medieval silhouette of which has been carved on the skyline for nearly 1,000 years. A hulking structure that dominates this small town, it was established in 1069 by Benedict of Auxerre. The Abbey was the first to be founded in the north of England after the Norman Conquest and was granted a founding charter by William the Conqueror, which gave it privilege and power. Indeed, could Selby be the birthplace of William’s son, the future Henry I, as is claimed?

The Explorer's Road:

Lincoln

You don’t need to be a mountain climber to see all of Lincoln’s places of interest but you could be forgiven for thinking that such skills might help. For Lincoln is most definitely divided into uphill sights and downhill sights. Linking the two is one of the city’s main attractions, Steep Hill, the vertiginous cobbled street that connects the lower, modern city with its medieval heart.

So if you’ve arrived at ground level, first take in the modern lower town, which provides a bustling contrast to the venerable buildings uphill. Two 10th-century churches, St Mary le Wigford, close to the train station, and, a 10-minute walk further south, St Peter-at-Gowts, have Saxon towers. Inside the former dangles a magnificent 17th-century chandelier, given to the city for surviving a siege during the English Civil War.

The Explorer's Road:

Southwell

Southwell may at first appear a regular English market town. But delve deeper and you’ll discover that it’s blessed with historic sites of national importance, has entertaining tales to tell about kings who passed through its streets, and is even the home of the humble Bramley cooking apple.

What’s more, this little town on the River Greet, at the edge of Sherwood Forest, has escaped the attention of developers and retains a strong sense of individuality and civic pride. Although the town has many vernacular buildings to please your eye, its highlight is unquestionably the minster, begun around 1110 by the Archbishop of York and deemed one of England’s most beautiful buildings. It was greatly admired by James I in 1603, on his way south to be crowned king. He compared it to the minster at York and cathedral at Durham. Gaze at the unique pyramidal roofs atop its twin square towers, and you’ll see why it is so regarded.

The Explorer's Road:

Newark

For a modest-sized market town in the flatlands of north Nottinghamshire, Newark-on-Trent offers some delightful surprises. It location where the ancient Great North Road met the old Roman Fosse Way gave this place a huge commercial advantage, and it was once as important as Nottingham. Today, this history makes it a compelling place to visit.

Newark’s wealth was based on wool; its merchants bought from sheep-breeders in the surrounding countryside and sold the textile on to the clothiers of Flanders. So it is not surprising that at the town’s heart is one of Britain’s finest market squares. Few eyesores intrude on its historic fabric, and the wandering eye soon discovers one of Newark’s characteristics, its wonderful red pantiled roofs. Most of the buildings date from the 17th to 19th centuries, but the Queen’s Head and White Hart Inn still have their medieval timber framing. Look up at the first and second floors of the White Hart and wonder what the idea was behind the rows of 24 painted terracotta figures of saints standing beneath fussy golden canopies.

The Explorer's Road:

Grantham

If British people know only one thing about Grantham, it’s that the UK’s first female Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was born in the town. Fewer could tell you that the great scientist Sir Isaac Newton – born at nearby Woolsthorpe Manor – was educated here. These venerable figures hint at a town with an extraordinary influence that has stretched well beyond its boundaries down the centuries.

Those who rush past Grantham on the railway between London and Edinburgh might regret their folly as they speed across the high embankment and spy the town’s great church with its extraordinarily high steeple. A recent book rating England’s 1,000 best churches asserts that it is the finest steeple in the country, and it belongs to Grantham’s showstopper sight, St Wulfram’s Church, built from the 12th to 15th centuries where a Saxon church once stood.

The Explorer's Road:

Oakham

Small is beautiful when it comes to Oakham. Yet, despite the fact that it has only one main road, which soon gives out onto green fields, this historic market town is a capital – of England’s smallest county, Rutland. Take the time to stroll about these ancient streets to discover its charms, old and new.

This higgledy-piggledy settlement centres on a traditional market square and remains relatively unknown as tourists speed on to more familiar destinations. Stop and you’ll soon discover what they are missing. Wander at will or follow the waymarked heritage trail, which provides an easy tour of this architectural tapestry woven from the gingerbread ironstone, Collyweston slate, and corn-yellow limestone hewn from local quarries.

The Explorer's Road:

Stamford

When a Scotsman claims that an English town is the finest sight on the road between London and Edinburgh you know he must be onto something. That was the view of the novelist Sir Walter Scott when his coach stopped for a change of horses in the unspoilt streets of honey-coloured stone houses that is Stamford.

He wasn’t alone in offering a ringing endorsement. There have been many down the years (not forgetting, too, the countless films that have used its stately grandeur as a backdrop). In 1967, when Stamford became Britain’s first conservation area, the late British poet laureate Sir John Betjeman hailed it as ‘England’s most attractive town’, and more recently the Sunday Times newspaper dubbed it the best place to live in Britain.

The Explorer's Road:

Uppingham

Tucked away in the green folds of the English countryside, Uppingham is little known even within these isles. Yet draw back the veil on this old-world scene and you’ll reveal a huddle of honey-coloured stone houses cradling an ancient market place where this rural community still comes together.

For 800 years, farmers have traded their animals and produce in this small, commercial hub around which cluster intimate cafes, cosy pubs, classy hotels and quaint speciality shops. While you may not need a brand-new saucepan, don’t let that deter you from taking a look around Norton’s, the 250-year-old ironmonger’s; you’ll spot it by the ancient hand plough perched above the door.

The Explorer's Road:

Hitchin

With its timber-framed buildings and cobbled streets, Hitchin has in parts the look and feel of a quaint English village. Yet it also has the pull of a town at least twice its size, supporting two excellent museums, Hertfordshire’s largest parish church, and a high street buzzing with life.

It’s this juxtaposition that has earned Hitchin a reputation as one of the country’s best places to live. And while the town is certainly beloved by its 33,000 inhabitants, its qualities are sufficiently tangible to leave their mark on you, too. The centrepiece is Market Place, a pedestrianised square that’s home to a year-round café scene and a revolving host of visiting attractions, from carousels and vintage car shows to street-food stalls and mini festivals. This is the town’s historic heart, for centuries the location of its famous market, and it’s here, and in the ancient adjoining side streets, Bucklesbury and Sun Street, that you’ll find most period buildings. Admire the wonky late-medieval and Tudor facades that Hitchin generally seems to have in abundance, a 16th-century coaching inn and the imposing Victorian-era former corn exchange, complete with weather vane and tower.

The market itself, however, has moved a few yards east, to a sprawling site by the River Hiz, and while it retains a broad offering on Tuesdays and Saturdays, on Fridays this is the place to find antiques and collectables. While on Sunday it has a more second-hand, car-boot feel about it. This is where you’ll also find the monthly combined craft and farmers’ market.

Next door is Hitchin’s main attraction, St Mary’s Church, which was built in the 13th-14th centuries, although you’ll be right to think its tower is even older, it dates back to 1190. Be sure to seek out the ornate 15th-century wooden screen, with its elaborate carvings of angels, while also taking in the admirable medieval timber ceilings. The church sits in generous grounds, which, on one side lead down to a stretch of the river, where you can mingle with swans, geese, ducks and the occasional black squirrel. It all makes for a lovely scene when viewed from the opposite banks of the river, with the church, its lawn and the water joined, in shot, by a weeping willow.

That a town of Hitchin’s size should be home to such a major church is a reflection of the wealth it amassed on the back of the wool trade in medieval times, partly thanks to its proximity to the Icknield Way – an ancient trackway that passes through the town’s outskirts and remains largely navigable today. During the 14th century, both a priory and a Carmelite friary were established in the town, and both original buildings remain – the former, known latterly as The Biggins, is tucked away in a side road on the perimeter of the market; while, the friary building is today the grand Hitchin Priory hotel, which hosts many events in its vast grounds, including the town’s main fireworks display.

To the east of St Mary’s Church, the British Schools Museum, in a series of listed original school buildings dating from the Victorian and Edwardian periods, is the place to see a 166-year-old galleried classroom. Here, also, is the world’s only remaining Monitorial (or Lancasterian) schoolroom – built to the specifications of educator Joseph Lancaster, who established a revolutionary teaching system, in which a single master could school a vast number of children by enlisting the teaching support of their better-performing pupils. There are collections of schoolbooks and artefacts to study, and a broad programme of exhibitions to see, including, on certain dates, authentic recreations of Victorian school lessons.

From here it’s a short walk to Hermitage Road, Hitchin’s most exciting thoroughfare, home to delis, restaurants, tattooists, craft-beer store, record shop and an ice-cream parlour. It connects the high street with Windmill Hill, which, on snowy days, is where you’ll usually find most of the town’s inhabitants, sledges in hand. And, while the hill no longer has a windmill at its summit, it’s still worth making the steep ascent to take in the views over the rooftops out to the Hertfordshire countryside that surrounds Hitchin.

Across town, on Brand Street, the second of Hitchin’s two museums, the North Hertfordshire Museum, is housed in a smart new building adjoining the Edwardian town hall, which has itself also had an extensive renovation. In the downstairs gallery find out about the wider area, from prehistory to the present, while upstairs, the highlight of the Living Hertfordshire gallery is the old-fashioned counter of Perks and Llewelyn, the chemist that stood on the High Street until 1961, complete with bottles, jars and mahogany fittings.

Around the corner from Brand Street, squirrelled away in the grounds of the public library, is the Physic Garden with a bronze sundial in the shape of a large pestle and mortar at its centre, while around it 100 different species of plants are split into four categories – household, internal elements, external elements and culinary usage. Some are toxic, and come with red warning signs, but don’t let that put you off, for no matter what time of year you visit, something will be flowering, although the garden is at its most colourful and fragrant in early summer.

This is also the best time to visit Hitchin’s outdoor swimming pools, the local nature reserve at Oughtonhead Common (famous for its longhorn cattle and variety of habitats), and the rows of lavender that stripe the landscape at the family-run Hitchin Lavender in the neighbouring village of Ickleford. Paying visitors get to explore this lilac blanket armed with scissors and a paper bag — collect as much as you need, a fragrant memory of your travels to Hitchin.

The Explorer's Road:

Hertford

Some 500 years ago, Hertford was the home of England's Parliament, albeit briefly, today it continues to play an important role as the county town. But there's much more to Hertford than politics and government. Stroll the streets at its historic heart and you'll see impressive architecture and, along the way, uncover a few fascinating stories about this lively town.

Hertford sits where the Rivers Lea, Beane and Mimram meet, an eminently walkable town, its compact core fanning out from the town's main highlight, Hertford Castle. The Norman castle that once stood here – hosting many royals over the years, including Elizabeth I for a large part of her childhood – has long since crumbled away. However, the 15th-century gatehouse still stands, now the home of the town council, having been extended and remodelled over the years to become the treasured structure it is today.

Berwick

Border Holiday Homes

Whether you're planning a romantic break or an active holiday, you'll want a comfortable base from which to explore England's northernmost county. Our five self-catering properties, all sleeping two people, have been chosen for their great locations. They're all modernised to a high standard and are stylishly furnished. Pets are welcome in four of them.

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Berwick

Border Holiday Homes

borderholidayhomes.co.uk


Whether you're planning a romantic break or an active holiday, you'll want a comfortable base from which to explore England's northernmost county. Our five self-catering properties, all sleeping two people, have been chosen for their great locations. They're all modernised to a high standard and are stylishly furnished. Pets are welcome in four of them.

Our two apartments in Berwick-upon-Tweed are ideal for less mobile guests. Old Templars Cottage is a conveniently located ground-floor garden flat just a few metres from the golden sands of Spittal beach, with its 1920s Venetian pavilion cafe. Nearby, we also offer a third-floor apartment in an old granary, Mill Wharf, which is on one level, is served by a lift and has fantastic harbour and river views
Benfield Cottage is a cosy, characterful hideaway in the conservation village of Morebattle -from where you can stride out on the many footpaths to explore the Cheviot Hills. Tweed Cottage, a charming bolthole in sleepy Paxton village, has calming riverside walks on its doorstep. Turner Cottage, close by the River Tweed in historic Norham, is a delightful single-storey cottage, whose lounge walls are an homage to JMW Turner's paintings of the local Norham Castle.

Berwick

Composers at Woodlands

Location, location, location: Composers at Woodlands' five-star, self-catering holiday properties are the ideal getaway in the perfect spot. Just minutes from the beach and border town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, our luxurious cottages offer class, comfort and convenient access to the attractions of Northumberland and the Scottish Borders.

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Berwick

Composers at Woodlands

composers-woodlands.co.uk


Location, location, location: Composers at Woodlands' five-star, self-catering holiday properties are the ideal getaway in the perfect spot. Just minutes from the beach and border town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, our luxurious cottages offer class, comfort and convenient access to the attractions of Northumberland and the Scottish Borders.

Thanks to our peaceful, rural location, on the edge of the Coastal Path and within sniffing distance of the sea, you're guaranteed a relaxing escape. However, we're also only a short hop from shops, restaurants, cafe bars and other local amenities, so you can find everything you need, quickly and easily.

Built in 2006, and continually maintained to the highest standard, our modern cottages are unique. With our background in the music industry, each property is named after a composer - Elgar, Bernstein, Vivaldi and Chopin - with a suitably reflected style, colour and design.

They have everything you need: calming décor, a fully equipped kitchen, sink-into leather suites, a digital TV, DVD player, free Wi-Fi, spacious bathroom and double and twin-bedded rooms

Plus, each cottage has a private patio, where you can sit in an evening, gazing up at Northumberland's famous starry skies.

Berwick

Bamburgh Castle

Bamburgh Castle is a compelling sight from miles around, thanks to its location on an outcrop of volcanic rock, 150m above sea level. With a history of battles and royal rebellion, it has also gained legendary status over the years as the site of Sir Lancelot’s fictitious castle, Joyous Garde.

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Berwick

Bamburgh Castle

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Bamburgh Castle is a compelling sight from miles around, thanks to its location on an outcrop of volcanic rock, 150m above sea level. With a history of battles and royal rebellion, it has also gained legendary status over the years as the site of Sir Lancelot’s fictitious castle, Joyous Garde.

More than 3,000 display items document the tastes of the castle’s successive owners, from porcelain to artworks, in 14 State Rooms. But it’s our Armstrong and Aviation Museum that surprises; discover the engineering career of the first Lord Armstrong, who restored the castle in 1894, and artefacts from two world wars.

Bamburgh Castle dominates the Northumberland coastline with views out to The Farne Islands and Lindisfarne and inland to The Cheviot Hills. Towering above miles of empty beaches, it’s a perfect birdwatching spot – look out for terns, cannets or hen harriers, and fulmars, which have nested here on the battlements for centuries.

First mentioned in 547AD, this citadel has been added to over the centuries – explore the towers and walls with our visitors’ map. Much of the castle, such as the library and Great Hall, is a Victorian restoration, but there are original parts to seek out, too, including 8th-century St Oswald’s Gate, the fortification’s first entrance.

Berwick

The Lindisfarne Inn

South of the historic Borders town of Berwick-upon-Tweed on the Northumberland coast, The Lindisfarne Inn is a traditional English country pub with rooms providing a cosy pit-stop for visitors heading out to Holy Island and walkers and cyclists taking to the local trails.

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Berwick

The Lindisfarne Inn

bamburghcastle.com


South of the historic Borders town of Berwick-upon-Tweed on the Northumberland coast, The Lindisfarne Inn is a traditional English country pub with rooms providing a cosy pit-stop for visitors heading out to Holy Island and walkers and cyclists taking to the local trails.

Our award-winning inn has 23 modern, en-suite bedrooms including family, accessible and designated pet friendly rooms.

Walkers can stride out on St Oswald's Way and St Cuthbert's Way. While cyclists can explore the Sandstone Way and Coast & Castle routes which pass our doorstep. Our award-winning facilities for cyclists include secure bike storage, bike repair stand and wash-down areas - handy for muddy boots and dogs too! We offer a packed lunch service from our ‘Explorers Menu' so you're all set to head out again to enjoy the area's natural splendour.

Work up a thirst in the Northumberland fresh air, then head back for a pint of ale in our bar and a delicious home-cooked meal. Look out for local flavours including game and seafood on our daily changing specials board.

Berwick

Blue Bell Belford

A 17th-century coaching inn, the Blue Bell Hotel in the village of Belford has rustic charm, 25 en-suite rooms – some with four-poster beds – and a great location, equidistant from the rolling Northumberland National Park, the sweeping coast and some of the best golf courses in the north east.

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Berwick

Blue Bell Belford

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A 17th-century coaching inn, the Blue Bell Hotel in the village of Belford has rustic charm, 25 en-suite rooms – some with four-poster beds – and a great location, equidistant from the rolling Northumberland National Park, the sweeping coast and some of the best golf courses in the north east.

Kids will enjoy the hotel’s sun terrace and play park – that’s if they have any energy left after a day exploring the nearby beaches, castles and countryside. Parents can sit and enjoy a real ale from the bar while the kids play – and everyone works up an appetite for a dinner in the Garden Restaurant.

Upgrade your room with pre-booked treats such as a baked Camembert and wine snack-for-two or even a Luxury Romance Package, which turns a stay into a real event with a confection of rose petals, Prosecco, bath bombs and cupcakes delivered to your room.

You can bring your four-legged friend along, too. We offer dog-friendly rooms and even have a dogs’ refreshment area in the main bar. Here, you – and they – can relax beside a roaring log fire after a long walk along the Northumberland Coast Path.

Berwick

Ford & Etal Estates

One destination, two idyllic villages, 20 attractions - at Ford & Etal you can create your own perfect day out. Tucked between the Cheviots and the Scottish Border, our agricultural estate offers a bit of everything - from walking trails to cosy tearooms, historic battlefields to the most northerly steam railway in England.

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Berwick

Ford & Etal Estates

ford-and-etal.co.uk


One destination, two idyllic villages, 20 attractions - at Ford & Etal you can create your own perfect day out. Tucked between the Cheviots and the Scottish Border, our agricultural estate offers a bit of everything - from walking trails to cosy tearooms, historic battlefields to the most northerly steam railway in England.

Our 5,500 hectares of unspoiled countryside are open for exploration all year. Cycle or stroll our paths and bridleways, and paddle a canoe along the burbling River Till. Visit the Duddo standing stones (Northumberland's Stonehenge) and march in the footsteps of 16th-century soldiers at Flodden Field - today's tranquil landscape belies its turbulent past.

Don't miss Lady Waterford Hall, a building commissioned by the Marchioness, and once the village school. An associate of John Ruskin and the pre-Raphaelite movement, she spent 21 years decorating the interior with Biblical murals. You can also learn to grind your own flour at our working corn mill, meet the largest herd of rare-breed Clydesdales at our Heavy Horse Centre, delve deeper into borderlands history at Etal Castle, and take a ride on our narrow-gauge steam train.

A warm Northumbrian welcome awaits wherever you go, especially in our villages. Browse rare books and paper craft in our quirky shops, pop into one of our pubs for a real ale, or visit a cafe for slice of traditional Border Tart.

Berwick

Market Cross Guest House

Set in the tranquil village of Belford, in north Northumberland, our five-star B&B was once part of a Georgian coaching house. Now it's home to four en-suite bedrooms, providing guests with a comfortable base from which to explore the surrounding countryside and coast.

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Berwick

Market Cross Guest House

marketcrossbelford.co.uk


Set in the tranquil village of Belford, in north Northumberland, our five-star B&B was once part of a Georgian coaching house. Now it's home to four en-suite bedrooms, providing guests with a comfortable base from which to explore the surrounding countryside and coast.

Our rooms come with king-size beds, White Company toiletries and Nespresso machines, plus large-screen TVs and luxury linens. Breakfast is a real treat where the breads, jams, marmalades, granola and even the baked beans are made by us. Similarly, the sweet treats you'll find in your room, including shortbread and cherry flapjacks, are home-baked, as is the cake we'll welcome you with on arrival.

Food is important to us, and what we can't make or grow ourselves, we source locally. The flour used in our bread and cakes comes from Heatherslaw, one of the country's few water-powered mills, our sausages and bacon are from Carters in Bamburgh, while our kippers and salmon are smoked at Swallows in Seahouses, whose heritage stretches back to 1843.

Berwick

The Bamburgh Castle Inn

Enjoy a seaside break at The Bamburgh Castle Inn, a traditional English pub overlooking the harbour in Seahouses. Situated on one of the best water's edge locations, take in views of the famous Farne Islands and Holy Island. It's an ideal base for exploring the beaches, castles and coves of the Northumberland coastline.

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Berwick

The Bamburgh Castle Inn

bamburghcastlehotel.co.uk


Enjoy a seaside break at The Bamburgh Castle Inn, a traditional English pub overlooking the harbour in Seahouses. Situated on one of the best water's edge locations, take in views of the famous Farne Islands and Holy Island. It's an ideal base for exploring the beaches, castles and coves of the Northumberland coastline.

Book a sea-view bedroom and fall asleep to the sound of the sea and the flash of the Longstone lighthouse. Enjoy your morning coffee on your private balcony watching the boats going to and from the Farne Islands. Keep an eye out for dolphins, whales or seals which can be spotted from our windows.

Fill up with hearty, home-cooked food in our restaurant, which offers daily specials using local ingredients such as local game and shellfish. We've a generous Sunday carvery, too with traditional homemade Yorkshire Puddings and hand carved joints of British meats. Eat al fresco in our beer garden which offers superb views of the Northumberland coast and our namesake, Bamburgh Castle where our overnight guests enjoy 10% off admission.

Soak away your cares in the whirlpool tub, have a steam in the spa room or swim in the 20m pool at the nearby Ocean Club which is available for our guests to use. A wide range of health and beauty treatments can be booked directly with the Club.

Alnwick

Shepherd’s Retreats Cottages

By the long, sandy beach of Beadnell, within walking distance of Dunstanburgh and Bamburgh castles, Shepherds Retreats has one of the best coastal locations in Northumberland. Ranging from cosy huts to a large family-friendly cottage, each of our self-catering hideaways has its own unique character – and its own inspiring views.

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Alnwick

Shepherd’s Retreats Cottages

mainscottages.co.uk


By the long, sandy beach of Beadnell, within walking distance of Dunstanburgh and Bamburgh castles, Shepherds Retreats has one of the best coastal locations in Northumberland. Ranging from cosy huts to a large family-friendly cottage, each of our self-catering hideaways has its own unique character – and its own inspiring views.

Our six accommodation options cater for every group size, from couples to get-togethers of up to 26 people. Indulge your romantic side in one of our Luxury Shepherds Huts, which are made by a local craftsman from reclaimed materials. They’re perfect for admiring Northumberland’s dark skies: lay back in bed to gaze through the glass ceiling or look up at the stars from the wood-fired hot tub.

No matter which retreat you choose, you’ll have your own outdoor space, too, for each one has a secluded garden. Perhaps pick our Shepherd’s Lodge, a three-bed log cabin where you can look over the fields to the sea. Or opt for our Bothy, where you can spend evenings on the patio, warmed by the chiminea, watching the sun set over the Cheviots.

Alnwick

Howick Hall & Garden

Sip a cup of Earl Grey tea in the very place where it was first created: the ancestral seat of the British Earls Grey since 1319. Wander our extensive gardens and secluded woodlands, and lose yourself in our Arboretum, where you'll find more than 11,000 shrubs and trees.

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Alnwick

Howick Hall & Garden

howickhallgardens.com


Sip a cup of Earl Grey tea in the very place where it was first created: the ancestral seat of the British Earls Grey since 1319. Wander our extensive gardens and secluded woodlands, and lose yourself in our Arboretum, where you'll find more than 11,000 shrubs and trees.

A good place to start is our visitor centre where you can learn how these beautiful gardens evolved.

Take a look around our early Victorian church and its graveyard to admire the fascinating memorials to the estate's previous owners, including gargoyles carved by Maria, third countess Grey. Then quench your thirst with a cuppa in our elegant Tea House, the former ballroom in the hall's easterly quadrant. You can learn about Howick's famous owner, Charles, second Earl Grey, who was Britain's Prime Minister from 1830 to 1834. The tea was specially blended by a Chinese mandarin to offset the taste of the water that came from the Howick spring and named after him. You can gaze upon important historic paintings and portraits, commissioned in the early 19th century.

Alnwick

The Hog’s Head Inn

Named after the tavern in the Harry Potter books, The Hog's Head Inn is a contemporary pub with rooms just a short broomstick ride from the imposing Alnwick Castle, which doubled for Hogwarts School in the Harry Potter films.

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Alnwick

The Hog’s Head Inn

hogsheadinnalnwick.co.uk


Named after the tavern in the Harry Potter books, The Hog's Head Inn is a contemporary pub with rooms just a short broomstick ride from the imposing Alnwick Castle, which doubled for Hogwarts School in the Harry Potter films.

Our 53 spacious en-suite bedrooms include larger family rooms sleeping up to six are perfect for extended families and larger groups. Our award-winning facilities for guests with accessibility needs include inter-connecting rooms for guests travelling with carers, fully equipped wet rooms and a no-step bar and dining area. We have a designated number of dog-friendly rooms, too.

Tuck into a traditional English Sunday lunch at our popular carvery where succulent topside of beef, roast pork or turkey breast is served with all the trimmings, including homemade Yorkshire puddings. Meat lovers will be tempted by our menu of local speciality steaks, cooked on our special broiler.

With plentiful onsite parking, conveniently close to the A1, we are perfect for exploring Northumberland - be it ‘broomstick training' at Alnwick Castle, exploring the world-famous Alnwick Gardens or just taking in the natural beauty of the beaches and cliffs of the Northumberland coast.

Return home to The Hog's Head Inn for a local real ale or artisan gin and our celebrated homemade cooking. On warmer days our sunny terrace is just the place to enjoy a sundowner while the children have fun in our ‘Hogshead Castle' play area.

Alnwick

The Amble Inn

Our contemporary seaside pub with rooms sits in the heart of the pretty fishing village of Amble. With 30 well-appointed rooms, including family- and dog-friendly options, we provide a stylish and cosy base from which to explore the local area.

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Alnwick

The Amble Inn

theambleinnamble.co.uk


Our contemporary seaside pub with rooms sits in the heart of the pretty fishing village of Amble. With 30 well-appointed rooms, including family- and dog-friendly options, we provide a stylish and cosy base from which to explore the local area.

Amble, at the south end of the Northumberland Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, is full of charm and things to do. Take a puffin cruise to Coquet Island and catch the annual Puffin Festival that's held here in May, and strike out for Bamburgh, Alnmouth and tiny Low Newton-by-the-Sea, all of which lie nearby on the same stretch of coast.

We have a passion for local produce and our restaurant specialises in seafood, with plenty of just-caught fish and shellfish dishes on the menu. Or try a traditional English Sunday lunch at our carvery, which is served with all the trimmings, including our renowned Yorkshire puddings.

Sink into an armchair by our open fire in the cosy bar and enjoy an after-dinner drink - perhaps a craft beer or a local real ale from our guest hand pulls? The bar - like the rest of our inn - welcomes children and dogs, and we're accessible for wheelchair users.

Alnwick

Alnwick Castle and The Alnwick Garden

Best known as the filming location for Hogwarts School in the Harry Potter films, Alnwick Castle has been the family seat of the Dukes of Northumberland for eight centuries. Today its grand state rooms and courtyards, cradled by impenetrable walls, rise above The Alnwick Garden, whose ongoing horticultural innovation makes an equally magical visit.

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Alnwick

Alnwick Castle and The Alnwick Garden

alnwickcastle.com


Best known as the filming location for Hogwarts School in the Harry Potter films, Alnwick Castle has been the family seat of the Dukes of Northumberland for eight centuries. Today its grand state rooms and courtyards, cradled by impenetrable walls, rise above The Alnwick Garden, whose ongoing horticultural innovation makes an equally magical visit.

Learn to fly a broomstick on the Outer Bailey, where Harry Potter had his first lesson in the inaugural film. Aspiring wizards of all ages can join a free 25-minute Broomstick Training session, learning to mount, dismount and manoeuvre - finishing with a gravity-defying photo to take home.

It's said the gilded ceilings of the Alnwick's State Rooms were inspired by the Vatican - and its Italianate interiors are equally opulent, hung with silk coverings and paintings. Wander through history, stopping at the library - which starred in Downton Abbey episodes - and exhibitions including the Percy family's pedigree role.

The current Duchess of Northumberland has spent 18 years transforming The Alnwick Garden to dramatic effect. With The Grand Cascade as the centrepiece, the UK's only gated Poison Garden where visitors are treated to tales of misfortune, the largest collection of Japanese Tia haku cherry blossoms in the world, and Europe's largest wooden Treehouse which doubles as a first-class restaurant with wobbly bridges and viewing deck, ensures a fabulous day out.

Alnwick

Gallery Forty5 – Felton

A former village pub in the centre of Felton is where you'll find our lively arts and crafts centre. We offer exhibition and working space to local artists, designers and makers, and host workshops and classes for people who want to try out and learn new skills like painting, sewing and lino-printing.

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Alnwick

Gallery Forty5 – Felton

feltongallery45.co.uk


A former village pub in the centre of Felton is where you'll find our lively arts and crafts centre. We offer exhibition and working space to local artists, designers and makers, and host workshops and classes for people who want to try out and learn new skills like painting, sewing and lino-printing.
Catch an exhibition in one of our two galleries where we showcase work by local artists, including those working in our six studios on site. Upstairs our beautiful Long Room hosts regular music concerts, talks and events. It is available for private hire and local groups run a variety of classes from here.
Our bespoke gallery shop sells original pieces and locally made crafts, as well as gifts for both adults and children. Settle in to our cosy, fireside seating area where we serve delicious home baked cake, scones and coffee.

Alnwick

Kielder Water & Forest Park

At 648 sq km, we are the largest working forest in England, as well as being home to Kielder Water, the largest man-made lake in Northern Europe. We offer many ways to appreciate the great outdoors and our cafés and restaurants serve up tasty fare.

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Alnwick

Kielder Water & Forest Park

visitkielder.com


At 648 sq km, we are the largest working forest in England, as well as being home to Kielder Water, the largest man-made lake in Northern Europe. We offer many ways to appreciate the great outdoors and our cafés and restaurants serve up tasty fare.

We’re a hub for mountain-biking enthusiasts, with bike hire available and our skills area poses a challenge for all abilities. Prefer to explore on foot? You won’t be disappointed – there’s a great selection of walking trails to follow, including the 43km Lakeside Way, which encircles Kielder Water. You can enjoy the water too, aboard pleasure or fishing boats.

Whichever way you choose to explore, you’ll spot award-winning artworks set in a dramatic landscape. And be sure to keep your eyes peeled for Kielder’s wildlife species, including osprey and red squirrel. You can even get up close to the largest collection of raptors in the north at our Kielder Water Birds of Prey Centre.

Additionally, we are home to the largest International Dark Sky Park in Europe. At the end of the day you can relax in one of Landal Kielder Waterside’s luxury lodges and enjoy stargazing under the darkest skies in England.

Alnwick

Old Rectory Howick

Make yourself at home in our peaceful Georgian rectory, a historic retreat set in pretty gardens close to a secluded white-sand beach. We're on the doorstep of many of the area's best sights, but our sumptuous period bedrooms and cosy lounge, its fire lit in cooler months, are such comfortable places to relax you may prefer to stay in.

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Alnwick

Old Rectory Howick

oldrectoryhowick.co.uk


Make yourself at home in our peaceful Georgian rectory, a historic retreat set in pretty gardens close to a secluded white-sand beach. We're on the doorstep of many of the area's best sights, but our sumptuous period bedrooms and cosy lounge, its fire lit in cooler months, are such comfortable places to relax you may prefer to stay in.

Discover the pleasures of life in the slow lane in our splendid English country-house B&B. Enjoy a breakfast featuring eggs laid by our free-range hens, alongside local sausages. We'll also provide a packed lunch on request.

Our house is a great location from which to watch the local wildlife, using the complimentary binoculars we leave for our guests in each room. Keep an eye out for pheasants, barn owls and red squirrels, as well as the occasional hare. But when you fancy venturing further, you'll find plenty to do on our doorstep, visit Howick Hall and the castles at Dunstanburgh and Alnwick, amble around the old seaside village of Craster, or set off on a ramble through spectacular countryside and along the Northumberland Coast Path.

Alnwick

Battlesteads Hotel

Our environmentally conscious hotel is set in the Northumberland village of Wark. Base yourself in one of our 22 en-suite rooms, relax and dine in our restaurant, which serves locally sourced food. Then, sit back and train your eyes on the beautiful night skies in our on-site observatory.

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Alnwick

Battlesteads Hotel

battlesteads.com


Our environmentally conscious hotel is set in the Northumberland village of Wark. Base yourself in one of our 22 en-suite rooms, relax and dine in our restaurant, which serves locally sourced food. Then, sit back and train your eyes on the beautiful night skies in our on-site observatory.

Sustainability is at our core. That's why we've picked up a Gold Award from the Green Tourism Business Scheme - our rooms have carbon-neutral heating and locally sourced, organic toiletries, while our restaurant menus are full of fresh fruit and vegetables that we've grown ourselves in our garden polytunnels.

We're located within a Dark Sky Discovery site and offer a superb view of the stars overhead, including the Milky Way. Our own hotel observatory not only has two telescopes, but also has astronomers on hand to decode the celestial map for you, and we organise activities and events throughout the year.

You can also learn a completely new skill during your stay with us - from floristry and photography skills, to flower farming, fish smoking and even falconry - on one of our regular experience days. Or, if you're a beer fan, visit in July and join in the fun at our annual four-day Beer Festival.

Newcastle

Dilston Physic Garden

Discover the healing powers of plants at one of England's rare modern physic gardens. Set in the heart of rural Northumberland, each of Dilston Physic Garden's plants is labelled with information on its traditional herbal medical use, its derived medical drugs, and its place in folklore and magic.

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Newcastle

Dilston Physic Garden

dilstonphysicgarden.com


Discover the healing powers of plants at one of England's rare modern physic gardens. Set in the heart of rural Northumberland, each of Dilston Physic Garden's plants is labelled with information on its traditional herbal medical use, its derived medical drugs, and its place in folklore and magic.

Explore living science at our Time Space Zone, home to medicinal plants from around the world. Make a wish at the Cloutie Tree or watch the mesmerising Wind Sculpture. Children love our magical Witches Den and Explorer Trail and can discover more about plants at one of our regular Potion Club sessions.

Our aromatic Chamomile Lawn and Medicinal Meadows are fragrant places to sit and relax, or you can wander the 100 Willow Coppice. Follow our Labyrinth, taking a break at the Aroma Seat, and enjoy our Silent Space in the woodland. On fine days, there's nowhere like our Sun Dial Seat to restore mind, body and soul.

In summer, pay a visit to the Dilston Dispensary of Herbal Medicine to consult our registered medical herbalists. March to November, the Physic Shop sells locally produced botanical products, a small collection of brain-boosting potted plants, and our new book Botanical Brain Balms.

Newcastle

Cullercoats Bike and Kayak

Whether you want to see the coast from land or sea, by bike, kayak or stand-up paddle board (SUP), Cullercoats offers rentals and tours for all levels of ability. Explore independently or take lessons and even try for a certificate if you want a real challenge. One thing is for sure, you'll see the best of the Northumberland scenery.

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Newcastle

Cullercoats Bike and Kayak

cullercoatsbikekayak.co.uk


Whether you want to see the coast from land or sea, by bike, kayak or stand-up paddle board (SUP), Cullercoats offers rentals and tours for all levels of ability. Explore independently or take lessons and even try for a certificate if you want a real challenge. One thing is for sure, you'll see the best of the Northumberland scenery.

Cullercoats is handily located on the National Cycle Network's Route 1, so hire a touring hybrid or townie cruiser and take off on your own or join a guided journey around the local undulating terrain. If you plan to go further afield, we offer bike-and-bag-drop services, too.

Rule the waves on a guided kayak tour led by Cullercoats' experts. Early risers can paddle and watch the sun come up, followed by a snug breakfast by our log fire or at popular Rileys Fish Shack.

If you can't decide between land and sea then why not experience both, with a spot of coasteering. This exhilarating experience, including adult and family-friendly sessions, involves moving along the coastline on foot and in the water, clambering and swimming, and will leave you with flushed cheeks and in high spirits.

Newcastle

Gibside

Deep in the Derwent Valley, close to Tyne and Wear, the Gibside estate offers a fascinating look at 18th-century garden design, as one of the few remaining Georgian horticultural masterpieces in England. Created to impress, the estate's 2.5sq km of grounds, with its avenues of trees and sweeping vistas, draw the eye at every turn.

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Newcastle

Gibside

nationaltrust.org.uk


Deep in the Derwent Valley, close to Tyne and Wear, the Gibside estate offers a fascinating look at 18th-century garden design, as one of the few remaining Georgian horticultural masterpieces in England. Created to impress, the estate's 2.5sq km of grounds, with its avenues of trees and sweeping vistas, draw the eye at every turn.

Download the themed walking routes to see the gardens from different perspectives, including The Liberty Trail through the pleasure grounds and the Wonders of Nature trail through woodlands, wetlands and meadows. There are plenty of places to sit and contemplate along the way - or just refresh yourself afterwards with tea and cake at the café and second-hand bookshop in the Stables.

Siskins, sparrowhawks and green finches are just some of the rarer bird species you'll find here. Amateur ‘twitchers' can birdwatch from a hide near Snipes Dene woods and help to monitor bird numbers by recording what they spot.

Find adventure under the canopy of Gibside's woodland, where families of all ages can tackle log bridges, a low-ropes course and den-building, as well as the Strawberry castle play area. Smaller children will be enchanted by the mini-Gibside Hall in the Discovery Room at the Stables.

Newcastle

Northumbria Classic Cars

There are road trips, then there are Northumbria Classic Car Hire road trips. With our extensive fleet of elegant and iconic cars – from sleek MK2 Jaguars to retro-chic 1970s Triumphs – we will add a touch of sophistication to your driving experience.

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Newcastle

Northumbria Classic Cars

northumbriaclassics.com


extensive fleet of elegant and iconic cars – from sleek MK2 Jaguars to retro-chic 1970s Triumphs – we will add a touch of sophistication to your driving experience.

At Northumbria Classic Car Hire we’re passionate and knowledgeable about cars – you might have seen some of our motors on the BBC show, Antiques Road Trip. When you pick up a car from us, you know it will be well looked after, reliable – and a lot of fun.

Just imagine it: you’re behind the wheel of our Ford Mustang convertible, breeze riffling your hair as the dramatic north-east countryside rolls by. Or perhaps you’d prefer one of our other easy-to-drive autos? Choose from our range, which includes a Jaguar E-type Coupé, an MGB Roadster, a Morris Minor Convertible and a Humber Hawk that was once owned by a maharajah.

We include full insurance and a support service, so you can drive off worry-free. We can even arrange delivery (for £2 per mile) to airports, ferry ports and railway stations, so as soon as you arrive in the region, you can hit the road in style.

Newcastle

Newcastle Castle

Unlock the door to Newcastle's medieval heart as you explore our fortress, home to Britain's best-surviving example of a Norman stone keep. With nearly 2,000 years of history covering siege, storm and conquest, you'll get a rugged insight into northern England's turbulent past.

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Newcastle

Newcastle Castle

newcastlecastle.co.uk


Unlock the door to Newcastle's medieval heart as you explore our fortress, home to Britain's best-surviving example of a Norman stone keep. With nearly 2,000 years of history covering siege, storm and conquest, you'll get a rugged insight into northern England's turbulent past.

This was where armies gathered and criminals were imprisoned and executed. Venture through the Black Gate and explore the bloody secrets of the Castle Keep. Here you'll find graffiti dating back to the English Civil War, as well as evidence of where prisoners' chains hung on the walls.

From regal splendour to grim dungeons and Victorian slums, our exhibits will enable you to glimpse life as it would have been for the inhabitants of these well-preserved medieval buildings. Walk in the footsteps of vagrants, vagabonds and villains, discover the story of how Newcastle got its name, , and head up to the castle's rooftop to take in outstanding views of the city.

Newcastle

Blackfriars

There's been eating, drinking and carousing at Blackfriars Restaurant since the 13th century. The building, originally a Dominican friary, now hosts diners in the former refectory - imagine eating in possibly the oldest purpose-built dining room in the country.

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Newcastle

Blackfriars

blackfriarsrestaurant.co.uk


There's been eating, drinking and carousing at Blackfriars Restaurant since the 13th century. The building, originally a Dominican friary, now hosts diners in the former refectory - imagine eating in possibly the oldest purpose-built dining room in the country.

While Blackfriars' atmosphere is authentically medieval, our food is bang up to date - indeed, in 2018, we won the Taste of the North East award. Start with a cocktail in our Parlour Bar, the friars' original lounge. Sample our varied, gutsy menu, which focuses on seasonal ingredients sourced from local producers. Try our excellent-value lunches, Sunday roasts and delicious dinners, choosing between dishes such as hand-dived scallops and succulent slow-cooked ham.

In our candlelit Banquet Hall - once used by Edward III - tuck into a true medieval feast. Take a seat at one of our handcrafted oak tables, beneath flickering chandeliers, to be served roast meats, pottage and flagons of wine and ale.

If the food inspires you, head to the former libraries, now converted into a Cookery School, to learn everything from artisan bread-baking to chocolate making. Or retire to our Tasting Room, to savour our fine wines, whiskies and beers.

Newcastle

Experience North

There's no better way to get under the skin of a place than on a private tour. At Experience North, we specialise in creating hand-crafted and personalised private journeys through northern England, delivering unique, unforgettable experiences in the nation's historic and cultural heartland.

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Newcastle

Experience North

experiencenorthdmc.com


There's no better way to get under the skin of a place than on a private tour. At Experience North, we specialise in creating hand-crafted and personalised private journeys through northern England, delivering unique, unforgettable experiences in the nation's historic and cultural heartland.

We design bespoke tours so that you get the most out of your trip, no matter where your interests lie. Are you fascinated by art and history? We could take you on an expert-led jaunt to Newcastle's big-hitting and hidden galleries before a walking tour around Durham's UNESCO-listed city centre.

How about exploring North East England's film locations before sailing across to the Farne Islands for some of the country's best birdwatching? Or let us put together your ultimate tour of Yorkshire, on which you might meet Vikings in York, storm Norman castles, explore Industrial Revolution-era cities and tramp across the Moors and Dales.

No matter where you choose to explore, our professional, experienced and fun guides will bring to life every place you visit.

Newcastle

Northern Secrets

Create your own private adventure with the help of our local experts and discover the joys and fascinating history of northern England. Whether you want to make a day trip to Alnwick Castle or embark on a week-long tour of the north-east, we'll help you every step of the way.

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Newcastle

Northern Secrets

northernsecrets.co.uk


Create your own private adventure with the help of our local experts and discover the joys and fascinating history of northern England. Whether you want to make a day trip to Alnwick Castle or embark on a week-long tour of the north-east, we'll help you every step of the way.

Set your own agenda or seek inspiration from our suggestions. Pick our four-day itinerary, for example, and you'll discover all the historic highlights of the north-east, including two World Heritage sites. Pay a visit to the cradle of Christianity at the Holy Island of Lindisfarne, uncover the cultural heritage of the city of Newcastle-Gateshead, then hop over to Hadrian's Wall to watch archaeology in action, before taking a guided tour of the historic streets of Durham and its magnificent Norman Romanesque cathedral.

Book a full tailor-made holiday or just select the components you need. Ask us to organise your transport, book your tickets, reserve your accommodation or we can guide you through this process. We'll work with you to create a memorable journey.

Newcastle

Maldron Hotel Newcastle

An exciting new addition to Newcastle’s buzzing centre, our four-star hotel is set on Newgate Street, one of the city’s very earliest thoroughfares, just a few minutes’ walk from the railway station. This convenient location and a choice of 265 bedrooms makes it a great choice for a city break.

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Newcastle

Maldron Hotel Newcastle

maldronhotelnewcastle.com


An exciting new addition to Newcastle’s buzzing centre, our four-star hotel is set on Newgate Street, one of the city’s very earliest thoroughfares, just a few minutes’ walk from the railway station. This convenient location and a choice of 265 bedrooms makes it a great choice for a city break.

You’ll sense our local pride in the names of our rooms, each of which pays tribute to one of the city’s heroes. So, take your pick of accommodation inspired by local greats, including industrial designer Sir William Armstrong, railway pioneer Robert Stephenson, architect John Dobson, and property developer Richard Grainger.

Each room is supremely comfortable, supplied with high-speed Wi-Fi, flat-screen TVs, tea- and coffee-making facilities and access to 24-hour room service. We also serve quality food at affordable prices – including healthier options and choices free from nuts, gluten and dairy. Head to our Grain & Grill bar and restaurant, or Red Bean Roastery, which serve breakfast, lunch, afternoon tea, dinner and drinks.

Newcastle

Jarrow Hall

Visit our 11-acre site for an extraordinary view through the mists of time to English life 1,300 years ago. At Jarrow Hall you'll discover a dedicated museum telling the story of Bede, the author, scholar and linguist widely regarded as ‘the father of English history', and the fascinating Anglo-Saxon times he lived in.

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Newcastle

Jarrow Hall

jarrowhall.org.uk


Visit our 11-acre site for an extraordinary view through the mists of time to English life 1,300 years ago. At Jarrow Hall you'll discover a dedicated museum telling the story of Bede, the author, scholar and linguist widely regarded as ‘the father of English history', and the fascinating Anglo-Saxon times he lived in.

Meet the residents of our farm, home to rescued animals and rare breeds, including curly-coated pigs and Dexter Bullocks. Explore our experimental wattle-and-daub and timber-framed village buildings based on structures excavated within Anglo-Saxon Northumbria, picture medieval life at our reconstruction of Thirlings Hall, where villagers gathered for feasts and meetings, and visit the Grubenhaus, which served as a grain store, weaving shed and accommodation.

Our interactive museum, home to Europe's largest collection of coloured glass from the 7th and 8th centuries, is also the place to uncover unique stonework and artefacts. There's a full-sized reproduction of Codex Amiatinus too, only one of two in the world representing the oldest complete Latin Bible in existence. With special events, craft demonstrations, combat re-enactments and more, history is brought to life here at Jarrow Hall.

Newcastle/Gateshead

Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art

A striking sight both inside and out, the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art is the biggest contemporary art gallery in Europe. Experimental and inspiring world-class works command the enormous space: a six-storey former flour mill on the south bank of the River Tyne, with matchless views across the NewcastleGateshead cityscape.

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Newcastle/Gateshead

Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art

baltic.art


A striking sight both inside and out, the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art is the biggest contemporary art gallery in Europe. Experimental and inspiring world-class works command the enormous space: a six-storey former flour mill on the south bank of the River Tyne, with matchless views across the NewcastleGateshead cityscape.

At BALTIC you can immerse yourself in contemporary art - for free. Roam the 2,600 square metres of gallery space, where, at every step, you'll see something that will surprise, challenge and delight. Our ambitious programme of changing exhibitions and events means you'll find something new on every visit. So far, we've displayed the work of more than 450 artists from 60 nations, ranging from Antony Gormley to Yoko Ono.

Be sure to take the time to explore every floor. As well as our galleries, you can visit BALTIC Shop packed with inspiring homewares and artist products. Gaze out over the riverside from our fourth-floor outdoor terrace and fifth-floor viewing box. Or head up to floor six for inventive modern British fine dining in our panoramic rooftop restaurant.

Newcastle

Victoria Tunnel

Experience life in a Victorian wagonway at the multi-award-winning Victoria Tunnel. Learn how it was constructed and hear coal wagons heading for the River Tyne rattle past you in the dark. Originally built to transport coal from the Colliery to the river, this atmospherically preserved 19th-century wagonway runs under the city of Newcastle.

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Newcastle

Victoria Tunnel

ouseburntrust.org.uk


Experience life in a Victorian wagonway at the multi-award-winning Victoria Tunnel. Learn how it was constructed and hear coal wagons heading for the River Tyne rattle past you in the dark. Originally built to transport coal from the Colliery to the river, this atmospherically preserved 19th-century wagonway runs under the city of Newcastle.

The Victoria Tunnel operated between 1842 and the 1860s and was later converted into an air-raid shelter in 1939, providing safe refuge during the Second World War. In 2008 the tunnel was reopened for guided tours.

Beneath the brick ceilings, you can learn about wartime life. Listen out for sirens and planes flying overhead, while passing the wooden replica beds and benches that were once used to accommodate its wartime residents.

Operated by the Ouseburn Trust we offer two-hour tours on 364 days a year (suitable for children aged eight and over). Trips into our tunnel include finding out which landmarks you are beneath and the unique chance to walk under a section of Hadrian's Wall. In addition to our heritage tours, we have special events, including "Sounds of the Underground", Wine Tasting and Afternoon teas.

Newcastle/Gateshead

Sage Gateshead

In 2004, a disused wasteland on the banks of the River Tyne became one of the world’s top performance venues. A striking billow of glass and steel, the Sage Gateshead has transformed the region’s cultural life, providing a world-class space for making, exploring, listening to and learning about music, in all its forms.

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Newcastle/Gateshead

Sage Gateshead

sagegateshead.com


In 2004, a disused wasteland on the banks of the River Tyne became one of the world’s top performance venues. A striking billow of glass and steel, the Sage Gateshead has transformed the region’s cultural life, providing a world-class space for making, exploring, listening to and learning about music, in all its forms.

The building itself is an architectural icon. Even if you don’t have a concert ticket, enter (for free) to admire the audacious curves and excellent acoustics, listen to music on the concourse or grab a coffee overlooking NewcastleGateshead’s quay.

Musical diversity is key. You can catch everything here, from rock, pop and jazz to dance, indie, folk and electronica. We have our own orchestra, the Northern Sinfonia, the UK’s only full-time chamber orchestra. But we’ve hosted the likes of Blondie, James Brown and Nancy Sinatra, too.

Participation is encouraged – we want everyone to get involved. Join a beginners’ ukulele lesson, take a wind and brass workshop, enrol the kids in band camp, flex your vocal chords at our singing classes, or seek help breaking into the industry by studying with our professional musicians.

Newcastle

Motel One

England's northernmost city and the gateway to Scotland, there are few better locations than Newcastle for a brilliant English getaway. And our centrally located design hotel, complete with industrial-style exterior brickwork, is the perfect base from which to explore Newcastle's fascinating ‘coal and culture' sights and the borders beyond.

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Newcastle

Motel One

motel-one-com


England's northernmost city and the gateway to Scotland, there are few better locations than Newcastle for a brilliant English getaway. And our centrally located design hotel, complete with industrial-style exterior brickwork, is the perfect base from which to explore Newcastle's fascinating ‘coal and culture' sights and the borders beyond.

Our hotel has lots of local flair, from the striped wallpaper in Newcastle Utd colours in reception and our bar, to our bridges over the river Tyne design motif. The stylish faux-industrial bar pays homage to the achievements of local boy, Robert Stephenson, who designed the Rocket steam locomotive. Our hotel is affordable yet stylish, too; settle back in elegant chairs by Arketipo with distinctive steel frames, surrounded by leather furniture by Baxter and fine rugs by Jan Kath.

Sleep in comfy box-spring beds, then start your day with a healthy, organic breakfast - and a generous serving of free WiFi - then head out to explore ÒThe ToonÓ. Today's Newcastle is a lively city for art, architecture and night-life, and has impressively bridged the gap from the industrial to the post-industrial age. There is much to keep you going but once you've exhausted the sights, return to kick back and relax among the designer furniture of our One Lounge and Bar.

Durham

Beamish Museum

Step back into the North East of England of the 1820s, 1900s and 1940s at the innovative, open-air Beamish, The Living Museum of the North. Experience the amazing sights, sounds, smells and delicious tastes of the past, as you discover the stories of everyday life from the post and the people of the region.

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Durham

Beamish Museum

beamish.org.uk


Step back into the North East of England of the 1820s, 1900s and 1940s at the innovative, open-air Beamish, The Living Museum of the North. Experience the amazing sights, sounds, smells and delicious tastes of the past, as you discover the stories of everyday life from the post and the people of the region.

Explore the worlds within Beamish, which are faithful living - and life-size - recreations that include a 1900s Town, 1900s Pit Village, 1820s Georgian landscape and 1940s Farm. Imagine yourself living the life of a miner, quilter or wartime Land Girl as you travel through the areas, which are brought to life with vivid attention to detail that fools the senses and ignites curiosity.

Historic trams and buses will transport you around the beautiful 350-acre museum. Visit the school, take a trip on a steam train, sample treats from the sweet shop, go underground in the coal mine, explore the Edwardian shops and much more!

Enjoy delicious traditional food, including delectable cakes and fluffy scones from the Tea Rooms, fresh bread and cakes from the bakery, fish and chips from a coal-fired range in Davy's Fried Fish Shop, and a pint of local beer from The Sun Inn pub.

Barnard Castle

South Causey Inn

South Causey Inn is located between Durham City and Newcastle and welcomes guests with views across the beautiful Beamish Valley. Check into one of our luxury bedrooms and suites where outdoor private hot tubs, wood-beamed ceilings, and super-comfy four-poster beds are just part of the Inn’s charm.

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Barnard Castle

South Causey Inn

southcausey.co.uk


South Causey Inn is located between Durham City and Newcastle and welcomes guests with views across the beautiful Beamish Valley. Check into one of our luxury bedrooms and suites where outdoor private hot tubs, wood-beamed ceilings, and super-comfy four-poster beds are just part of the Inn’s charm.

From the nautical-themed Captain Cook’s Cabin and the hand-painted leafy ceilings of the Tree House to The Smithy, with its centrepiece wood-burning stove, our rooms, cottages, and suites make South Causey Inn unique. Consider booking the retro Trafalgar Square, set in a converted 1960s, red, double-decker bus, and relaxing in our state-of-the-art bar, a converted 1960s Bedford TK Fire Engine serving Gourmet Snacks, refreshments, Gins and brewed Beer. The Hot Spot comes equipped with an outdoor heated seating area and umbrellas.

Serving the best British home-cooked cuisine, we offer breakfast, lunch, Sunday carvery, and dinners, with special menus for food-loving children, gluten-free and vegan diners. Our signature Causey Afternoon Tea features cakes, scones and delicate sandwiches served on a miniature picnic table. Why not add a treat with a prosecco or the house-distilled famous RIP Gin (named after Rip our resident British Bull Dog).

Onsite the Antique and Vintage two-story Boutique Raine & James specialises in quirky, weird and wonderful pieces so no two visits here will look the same.

Bishop Auckland

Thomas Wright House

Escape to our family-run guesthouse in the tranquil surroundings of rural Byers Green, just outside Durham. Here, you'll find a peaceful retreat, with eight individually decorated guestrooms to choose from, and top-quality food on offer in our restaurant.

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Bishop Auckland

Thomas Wright House

thomaswrighthouse.com


Escape to our family-run guesthouse in the tranquil surroundings of rural Byers Green, just outside Durham. Here, you'll find a peaceful retreat, with eight individually decorated guestrooms to choose from, and top-quality food on offer in our restaurant.

Set just off the village green, Thomas Wright House is named after the ‘natural philosopher' astronomer who was born here in the 18th century. Our guestrooms are each named after a constellation in his honour. They're restful spaces, decorated in heritage colours, with wooden shutters on the windows. Book Aquila and you can enjoy a private terrace and hot tub, too.

We serve breakfast, lunch and dinner - afternoon tea and Sunday lunch, too - in our Garden Room, all prepared from local, seasonal produce whenever possible by our talented team of chefs. Other treats include the chance to indulge in a wide range of treatments offered in Our Hidden Beauty salon. While on our doorstep the Durham Dales beg to be explored.

Barnard Castle

Bowlees Visitor Centre

Set in attractive woodland and surrounded by flower-rich hay meadows, Bowlees Visitor Centre offers the perfect introduction to the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and Upper Teesdale - where miles of quiet rural roads, acres of accessible countryside and England's biggest waterfall make this a perfect place of discovery.

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Barnard Castle

Bowlees Visitor Centre

northpennines.org.uk


Set in attractive woodland and surrounded by flower-rich hay meadows, Bowlees Visitor Centre offers the perfect introduction to the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and Upper Teesdale - where miles of quiet rural roads, acres of accessible countryside and England's biggest waterfall make this a perfect place of discovery.

Our centre is a great starting point for walks that explore the local landscape. We can point you in the right direction for memorable hikes to Low and High Force waterfalls, Holwick Scar, Gibson's Cave and Summerhill Force. We also offer booklets of self-guided walks, nature guides and bike-trail maps.

Designated a UNESCO Global Geopark for its internationally significant geology, the North Pennines is a dramatic natural stage set, cut by Ice Age glaciers. Find out more at one of our regular geology events - or pick up a map from our centre showing the best geological trails across the landscape.
After striding out across the surrounding countryside, renew your energy in our Ford Kitchen with a sandwich, soup or homemade cake and a restorative cup of tea. Then pop to our shop for nature-inspired gifts and to see the art exhibitions upstairs.

Barnard Castle

Raby Castle

Set amid the moors and mountains of the Durham Dales, Raby Castle is one of the finest and best-preserved medieval castles in north-east England. More than 1,000 years of history lie within this ancient estate, once owned by King Cnut. Now, hear its stories, told by our expert stewards, who bring the Castle's heritage to life.

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Barnard Castle

Raby Castle

rabycastle.com


Set amid the moors and mountains of the Durham Dales, Raby Castle is one of the finest and best-preserved medieval castles in north-east England. More than 1,000 years of history lie within this ancient estate, once owned by King Cnut. Now, hear its stories, told by our expert stewards, who bring the Castle's heritage to life.

Probe the layers, from the early Viking days to the Castle's construction in the 14th century, and its change of ownership in 1626, when it was taken over by the family who are still the guardians of this piece of history. Discover centuries of intrigue in our extensive art collection and our period interiors, which range from the lavishly embellished Octagon Drawing Room to the medieval kitchen.

Raby Castle sits within 200 acres of undulating parkland, grazed by red and fallow deer and longhorn cattle. Browse the vintage carriages in the Coach House, allow your little ones to let off steam in the Woodland Play Area and treat yourself to some delicious, locally sourced food in our Stables Café and have a browse in the Stables Shop.

Then stride or cycle out across the estate, via the ponds and walled gardens, perhaps as far as High Force Waterfall, a striking 21m drop of water that's one of the country's fiercest cascades set in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Reward yourself with a well-earned drink, or perhaps an overnight stay at the newly refurbished High Force Hotel.

Barnard Castle

Old Well Inn

The Old Well isn't just a pub and B&B, it's a historic landmark. Set in the heart of Barnard Castle, spread across five age-old buildings, the inn dates back to 1540. Check in and relax in the welcoming bar to experience the hospitality that's made us four-time winners of the annual Teesdale Pub Of The Season award.

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Barnard Castle

Old Well Inn

theoldwellinn.co.uk


The Old Well isn't just a pub and B&B, it's a historic landmark. Set in the heart of Barnard Castle, spread across five age-old buildings, the inn dates back to 1540. Check in and relax in the welcoming bar to experience the hospitality that's made us four-time winners of the annual Teesdale Pub Of The Season award.

This pub has much history to reveal as a venue for secret meetings and as host to Oliver Cromwell. In 1877 the landlord was charged under the Mutiny Act for providing such poor conditions that Militia soldiers billeted there revolted. Take a peek into our cellar via our webcam to see the original well supplying water for brewing beer. Our 10 individually designed guest rooms have plenty of yesteryear character, too, some with four-poster beds, others with stone fireplaces or wood panelling.

You'll be served a hearty full English for breakfast. In fact, you won't go hungry here at any time of day. Tuck into our great pub grub - from fresh-caught fish to Sunday roasts. Every weekend our Taj Group-trained chef, Rima, cooks a banquet of authentic Indian dishes.

Wash it down with something from our extensive wine list or our range of cask ales. Join us for our Real Ale Festival, when there are new brews on tap plus live music and family entertainment in our sunny garden.

Darlington

Hampton by Hilton Stockton

The Hampton by Hilton in Stockton on Tees sits in the heart of the Northshore area, with stunning views across the river. Enjoy comfortable, contemporary accommodation in this modern hotel, within easy reach of the history and natural drama of the UK’s East coast, including Redcar and beautiful Whitby.

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Darlington

Hampton by Hilton Stockton


The Hampton by Hilton in Stockton on Tees sits in the heart of the Northshore area, with stunning views across the river. Enjoy comfortable, contemporary accommodation in this modern hotel, within easy reach of the history and natural drama of the UK’s East coast, including Redcar and beautiful Whitby.

Relax in one of our 128 hotel rooms, full of mod cons such as 50-inch HDTVs and desks with ergonomic chairs. Free WiFi comes as standard, and you’ll also get access to our 24-hour fitness centre.

Our hotel sits in a beautiful spot on the bank of the river Tees, with views across the river and the Cleveland hills from many of our rooms. Our location puts you close to local attractions and events including Tees Valley Barrage and International White-Water Centre and Stockton International Riverside Festival.

Taste the local flavours each morning with our complimentary hot breakfast, created from produce from the surrounding area and served by friendly and knowledgeable staff. Whether you want to know if the hash browns are gluten-free or the best thing to do on a Saturday morning, they’ll be able to help.

Darlington

Blackwell Grange

Deep in the County Durham countryside stands the grand Georgian façade of the Blackwell Grange Hotel, now a luxurious home-from-home. Cradled by woods and parkland, yet just 45 minutes from the historic cities of York and Newcastle, it offers the perfect sanctuary from busy modern life.

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Darlington

Blackwell Grange

blackwellgrangehotel.com


Deep in the County Durham countryside stands the grand Georgian façade of the Blackwell Grange Hotel, now a luxurious home-from-home. Cradled by woods and parkland, yet just 45 minutes from the historic cities of York and Newcastle, it offers the perfect sanctuary from busy modern life.

Romantics should book our shabby-chic four-poster suite and sip Champagne in a bath tub made for two. There’s no less romance, though, in any of our 108 other comfortable rooms, which include courtyard cottage suite; all match mod cons with character charm.

Take afternoon tea in our Blackwell Lounge, tucking into fluffy scones with cream and jam, macaroons, delicate eclairs and finger sandwiches. On a sunny day, you can enjoy this most English of customs out on the south terrace, fragrant with the scent of flowers and newly mown grass.

Get active at our Leisure Club, with a few lengths in the waters of the heated swimming pool or kilometres on the treadmill in the gym. Gain a healthy glow in the solarium and soothe your muscles in the spa bath or sauna.

Darlington

Rockliffe Hall

Rockliffe Hall blends bygone elegance with contemporary luxury, with parts of the property dating back to the 18th century. The estate only opened as a five-star retreat in 2009, but by 2016 we had won Visit England's Large Hotel of the Year award and established Rockliffe as an ideal bolthole for exploring - or simply relaxing in - the quiet countryside of County Durham.

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Darlington

Rockliffe Hall

rockliffehall.com


Rockliffe Hall blends bygone elegance with contemporary luxury, with parts of the property dating back to the 18th century. The estate only opened as a five-star retreat in 2009, but by 2016 we had won Visit England's Large Hotel of the Year award and established Rockliffe as an ideal bolthole for exploring - or simply relaxing in - the quiet countryside of County Durham.

Book yourself a memorable break here. Choose one of the unique bedrooms in our handsome Old Hall, where restored original features are mixed with all mod-cons. Or stay in our spacious New Hall rooms, all with marble-clad bathrooms and sunny, south-facing views over the gardens and golf course.

Have a swing of a club - our 18-hole championship course is one of the most challenging in Europe, though there are options available for beginners, too. Then soothe those tight shoulders in our spa, one of the country's largest, before sinking into the al-fresco hot pools in our new spa garden.

Finish with a culinary treat: order an aperitif in the Cocktail Bar, enjoy supper in our buzzy Brasserie, or take your tastebuds on an unforgettable journey via our 10-course tasting menu in The Orangery. The Clubhouse, which offers views over the golf course, serves up classic dishes and traditional Sunday roasts.

Darlington

Holiday Inn Scotch Corner

Our hotel, with its Art Deco influences, extends a stylish welcome. Set in a former 1930s red-brick hotel that was built on the site of a mid-16th century inn, each of our 91 rooms, from Standard Doubles to Family Rooms and King Executives, come with premium mattresses and bedding, complimentary Wi-Fi, and flat-screen TV with Freeview channels.

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Darlington

Holiday Inn Scotch Corner

ihg.com


Our hotel, with its Art Deco influences, extends a stylish welcome. Set in a former 1930s red-brick hotel that was built on the site of a mid-16th century inn, each of our 91 rooms, from Standard Doubles to Family Rooms and King Executives, come with premium mattresses and bedding, complimentary Wi-Fi, and flat-screen TV with Freeview channels.

Set just off the A1/A66 junction, we’re brilliantly located for exploring the Yorkshire Dales and the delightful medieval market town of Richmond (just a 10-minute drive away). But you need not step outside the hotel for a good meal. Tuck in to the Italian menu at our restaurant, Fratello’s, from classic pasta dishes to lesser-known Mediterranean specialities. Meanwhile our Columbus Bar is the place for casual dining focused around gastro pub-style menus, and great cocktails.

We’ve extensive grounds and a range of facilities to enjoy, too, including the Active Life Leisure Centre, home to a swimming pool, gym and hot tub, plus a range of beauty therapies on offer.

Darlington

Darlington Covered Market

Markets have been held in Darlington since medieval times and the marketplace is still the heart of this town. Today, on Mondays and Saturdays, outdoor stalls spill out down High Row and there’s an indoor market, too, set in the beautiful Grade II-listed Victorian Market Hall.

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Darlington

Darlington Covered Market

darlingtonmarket.co.uk


Markets have been held in Darlington since medieval times and the marketplace is still the heart of this town. Today, on Mondays and Saturdays, outdoor stalls spill out down High Row and there’s an indoor market, too, set in the beautiful Grade II-listed Victorian Market Hall.

Our elegant covered market, hung with chandeliers, first opened in 1864 – and there have been markets here twice weekly ever since. You’ll find all manner of goods, from jewellery and comics to sweets and fruit. Out on High Row, you can pick up hot snacks and drinks from food stalls to enjoy while you’re browsing. The market is a great place to buy local produce, and our traders are members of the Darlington community, running independent businesses, many of which have been passed through families for generations.

Darlington’s most famous landmark, the Clock Tower, rises above the marketplace. It’s a fine piece of Victorian architecture, gifted to the town by the industrialist and Quaker Joseph Pease. You might just recognise their sound; the Clock Tower houses the sister bells to London’s Big Ben.

Richmond

Inspired Chocolate

Get a taste of life as a Yorkshire chocolatier at our artisan factory, where you'll unwrap the secrets to creating truffles, fudge and other confectionary. Try your hand at crafting your own chocolates and sample some of the finest artisan Belgian chocolate crafted in England.

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Richmond

Inspired Chocolate

inspiredchocolate.co.uk


Get a taste of life as a Yorkshire chocolatier at our artisan factory, where you'll unwrap the secrets to creating truffles, fudge and other confectionary. Try your hand at crafting your own chocolates and sample some of the finest artisan Belgian chocolate crafted in England.

See vats and trays of warm liquid chocolate transformed into the delicious finished product. Sample almond and pistachio truffles, lemon and lime fondants, nutty caramels and cranberry fudge. We'll teach you everything you need to know about the history of the cocoa bean, and you can put your new-found expertise to the test with our interactive quiz.

Drop in on one of our workshops, where you'll learn to mould your own chocolate animals, turn your hand to truffle making, or become a master chocolate pizza maker. Before you leave, there will be more goodies to feast upon at our cafe and why not order your own personalised treats in the chocolate shop to take home.

Richmond

Georgian Theatre

Britain's oldest working theatre still in its original form, The Georgian Theatre Royal in Richmond is both a community playhouse and living theatre museum. Built by actor Samuel Butler in 1788, it offers a unique historical insight – as well as a contemporary programme of theatre and entertainment.

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Richmond

Georgian Theatre

georgiantheatreroyal.co.uk


Britain's oldest working theatre still in its original form, The Georgian Theatre Royal in Richmond is both a community playhouse and living theatre museum. Built by actor Samuel Butler in 1788, it offers a unique historical insight – as well as a contemporary programme of theatre and entertainment.

With capacity for an audience of 214, arranged in a rectangular form, the furthest seat in the house is only 10.7m from the stage. So you’re guaranteed a good view whatever performance you choose from the eclectic programme, which features everything from ballet and modern theatre to Shakespeare and stand-up comedians.

Real theatre magic happens behind the scenes, and on a tour of our venue you’ll get insight into the history – and secrets – of the playhouse. Stand on the stage itself, try on costumes and imagine the roar of the crowd and the smell of the greasepaint. You’ll also see the small museum housing the Woodland Scene, Britain's oldest surviving stage scenery.

Richmond

Green Howards Museum

The proud history of the Green Howards lives on in our museum dedicated to the illustrious infantry regiment that was raised in 1688. These brave soldiers gave 318 years of service before being amalgamated to form The Yorkshire Regiment in 2006. We tell their story through individual collections and generous donations, particularly following the First World War.

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Richmond

Green Howards Museum

greenhowards.org.uk


The proud history of the Green Howards lives on in our museum dedicated to the illustrious infantry regiment that was raised in 1688. These brave soldiers gave 318 years of service before being amalgamated to form The Yorkshire Regiment in 2006. We tell their story through individual collections and generous donations, particularly following the First World War.

Our museum features 200 uniforms, documents, photos and memorabilia – as well as weaponry from machine guns to pikes. Don't miss the Medal Room, where 4,000 types of award, including 15 Victoria Crosses and three George Crosses, create a powerful visual story of valour in war and the stories are told of the men who won them.

We also put on a lively events programme – from a periodic pop-up mess, serving Victoria sponge and other treats from the Veterans’ Artisan Bakery, to expert talks on subjects such as the impact of war on returning soldiers.

Richmond

Holiday at Home

Book a break at any of our luxury self-catering holiday properties across North Yorkshire and enjoy the five-star service of our family-run holiday company. Luxuriate in a penthouse apartment, cosy up in front of an open fire at any of our barn conversions or farm cottages, or live the high life in one of our large country houses.

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Richmond

Holiday at Home

holidayathome.co.uk


Book a break at any of our luxury self-catering holiday properties across North Yorkshire and enjoy the five-star service of our family-run holiday company. Luxuriate in a penthouse apartment, cosy up in front of an open fire at any of our barn conversions or farm cottages, or live the high life in one of our large country houses.

Experience the beauty of the Yorkshire Dales National Park as you unwind in any of our award-winning spacious wooden lodges at Brompton Lakes, admiring the panoramic views from your own private decked terrace. Soak up the peace of this natural retreat in your own log burning hot tub, then fire up the barbecue for an al-fresco lunch and spend the afternoon on the tennis court.

Alternatively, book a stay beneath the ramparts of medieval Richmond Castle in one of our five apartments comprising Darcy Mews, a converted period property overlooking Richmond Falls and the River Swale. Or perhaps your choice of residence will be 30 Frenchgate, an immaculate Georgian townhouse where you can relax in an elegant terraced garden with more of those fabulous views. Whichever property you choose, you can be sure of a relaxing stay in North Yorkshire.

Richmond

Newby Hall

One of England’s finest Adam houses, Newby Hall is set in gardens and woodland near Ripon. Built in the 1690s, following the style of Sir Christopher Wren, Newby is defined by exceptional 18th-century interiors. There’s much to see here, not least a rare set of Gobelin Tapestries, a gallery of classical statuary, and some of Thomas Chippendale's finest furniture.

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Richmond

Newby Hall

newbyhall.com


One of England’s finest Adam houses, Newby Hall is set in gardens and woodland near Ripon. Built in the 1690s, following the style of Sir Christopher Wren, Newby is defined by exceptional 18th-century interiors. There’s much to see here, not least a rare set of Gobelin Tapestries, a gallery of classical statuary, and some of Thomas Chippendale's finest furniture.

Beyond the house, explore the grounds on our miniature railway or one of our riverboat trips. Kids can run wild in our adventure playground, complete with pedalo boats and Tarantella-dancing water-play area. Don’t miss our landmark double herbaceous border, too; at 170m, this floral flourish, planted in the 1930s, is one of the longest in Europe.

There’s a miniature world to explore inside. Our dolls’ house exhibition comprises nearly 70 houses of all shapes, sizes, styles and ages. One of the most important private collections on display anywhere in the world, it’s the life’s work of celebrated collectors Caroline Hamilton and Jane Fiddick. And after all that, you can refuel on the cakes, bakes and sandwiches homemade in our licensed cafe-restaurant.

Richmond

Dower House & Spa

A short walk from the centre of Knaresborough, you’ll find the Dower House & Spa, a handsome historic property with an ivy-clad façade and neatly tended gardens. It’s the perfect base for exploring this pretty market town and the lovely Yorkshire Dales, yet lies within easy reach of Leeds and York, too.

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Richmond

Dower House & Spa

ashdalehotels.com


A short walk from the centre of Knaresborough, you’ll find the Dower House & Spa, a handsome historic property with an ivy-clad façade and neatly tended gardens. It’s the perfect base for exploring this pretty market town and the lovely Yorkshire Dales, yet lies within easy reach of Leeds and York, too.

Choose from our 29 individually styled bedrooms, and dine in our award-winning Storm Restaurant, where chef Victoria Vasallo serves up modern European food based on the best fresh Yorkshire produce. We also have a cosy residents’ bar, where you can sit by the wood-burning stove and taste some local ales. And there’s an on-site spa, with a pool, thermal suite and gym, that you’re welcome to use during your stay with us.

The history of the Dower House can be traced back to the 15th century when it was a private home owned by the Slingsbys, once one of the largest landowning families in the north of England. The main building at the heart of the hotel today dates from the mid-1700s and retains many period features, including the fine original staircase.

York

Newton House, Yorkshire

Elegant Newton House may date from the Georgian period but it has all the modern comforts you could want. Said to be built with stone from Knaresborough Castle, our 300-year-old townhouse serves up comfortable beds, award-winning breakfasts, and a warm welcome.

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York

Newton House, Yorkshire

newtonhouseyorkshire.com


Elegant Newton House may date from the Georgian period but it has all the modern comforts you could want. Said to be built with stone from Knaresborough Castle, our 300-year-old townhouse serves up comfortable beds, award-winning breakfasts, and a warm welcome.

Just a few miles from Harrogate, in the centre of the historic market town of Knaresborough, our 12 guest rooms include two for families, sleeping up to four (using our flexible ‘Guestbed' system, or two rooms that interconnect). We also have two pet-friendly rooms with direct access to our courtyard and car park. Our all-women team has created the Female Friendly Traveller Initiative, so our women guests who are travelling solo will feel right at home here.

We were proud to make the finals of the Best Yorkshire Breakfast in the Delicouslyorkshire/Yorkshire Post Taste Awards. At Newton House we believe in seasonal British food prepared in the traditional way, and we use local produce whenever possible. Our Slow Breakfasts feature homemade granola and compotes, plus organic milk and butter from the herds that graze Nidderdale's pastures, plus local salmon, eggs, and traditional, additive-free meats from Huttons Butchers of Knaresborough.

York

Castle Howard

“Among the great palaces of Europe”… “One of the top 10 buildings to visit in your lifetime”… “Gigantic and sublime”… Over its 300-year history, Castle Howard has been heaped with praise, all deserved. This stately home, a little north-east of York, is one of England’s great treasures.

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York

Castle Howard

castlehoward.co.uk


“Among the great palaces of Europe”… “One of the top 10 buildings to visit in your lifetime”… “Gigantic and sublime”… Over its 300-year history, Castle Howard has been heaped with praise, all deserved. This stately home, a little north-east of York, is one of England’s great treasures.

Tucked amid the Howardian Hills, a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, our estate commands dramatic views across the surrounding pastures. There are 1,000 acres of parkland to explore: stroll the formal gardens, take long woodland walks, and seek out the temples and fountains scattered throughout the grounds.

Built in the 18th century, and taking more than 100 years to complete, the house is still a family home – albeit a grand one. Admire our theatrical architecture and world-renowned collections, discover our wealth of Pre-Raphaelite paintings, learn about Queen Victoria’s visit and find out just how many times Castle Howard has been featured on the big and small screens.

Top off your visit with a little treat – perhaps an award-winning lunch at our Fitzroy Restaurant or Boathouse Cafe. Or create a picnic in our farm shop, which is brimful of tasty local produce.

York

York Minster

York Minster is one of the world’s most magnificent cathedrals. There are 2,000 years of history contained within its ancient foundations and its vast, intricately carved stone. And there are unexpected stories to be unearthed around every corner, from deep in the crypt to the top of the tallest tower.

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York

York Minster

yorkminster.org


York Minster is one of the world’s most magnificent cathedrals. There are 2,000 years of history contained within its ancient foundations and its vast, intricately carved stone. And there are unexpected stories to be unearthed around every corner, from deep in the crypt to the top of the tallest tower.

We can help you marvel at this masterpiece, which has been at the centre of Christianity in northern England since the 7th century. Join our free guided tour to discover more about the building and its huge collection of medieval stained glass – the largest in the country. Or join our special-access Hidden Minster tours, which peeks into secret spaces that are normally off limits.

Delve into our interactive Undercroft museum, in the Minster’s bowels, to journey back to Roman and Viking times. Then take our Tower Challenge: dare yourself to climb the 275 steps up the Central Tower for close-ups of the medieval stonework and Gothic grotesques, and for sweeping views over York’s old centre. Your ticket covers entry for a year, so you can return as often as you like to ensure you don’t miss a thing.

York

City Cruises

York is best-known for its alleys, or ‘snickelways,’ and the grand Minster, but we can give you a different perspective on this ancient city with a cruise along the River Ouse. Our boats journey upstream to Clifton Bridge and downstream to Millennium Bridge, offering sightseeing tours aboard our double-decker City Cruises boats.

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York

City Cruises

citycruisesyork.com


York is best-known for its alleys, or ‘snickelways,’ and the grand Minster, but we can give you a different perspective on this ancient city with a cruise along the River Ouse. Our boats journey upstream to Clifton Bridge and downstream to Millennium Bridge, offering sightseeing tours aboard our double-decker City Cruises boats.

Enhance your trip with a traditional English afternoon tea aboard the Captain James Cook. Watch the city go by in civilised fashion over dainty cakes and finger sandwiches, travelling the river that brought the Vikings and the Romans to the city.

See York at night for a romantic perspective when you take a 70-minute floodlit evening cruise that meanders through the city to a mellow jazz soundtrack. Night-time also offers the chance to experience Europe’s most haunted city (so they say). But don’t worry, if there’s a chill in the air – courtesy of an apparition or just the weather – you can always retreat to the heated saloon and bar.

For a memorable challenge, skipper your own boat on a self-drive tour. Nervous? Don’t be – you’ll receive instructions on the rules of the river and how to drive one of 14 simple motor boats, each holding up to eight people. Choose from half-hour or hour-long waterborne adventures.

York

York’s Chocolate Story

Unwrap the history of chocolate at York’s Chocolate Story. Explore the origins of chocolate from the ancient rainforests of Central America to its arrival on York’s cobbled streets. While other northern centres were founded on the wool, cotton and steel trades, our great city of York owes much of its riches to the production of this tasty treat.

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York

York’s Chocolate Story

yorkschocolatestory.com


Unwrap the history of chocolate at York’s Chocolate Story. Explore the origins of chocolate from the ancient rainforests of Central America to its arrival on York’s cobbled streets. While other northern centres were founded on the wool, cotton and steel trades, our great city of York owes much of its riches to the production of this tasty treat.

Follow our expert guides in the Story Zone as they lead you through the history of chocolate’s founding families, revealing the fascinating facts behind their finest creations. Continue this sweet journey in our Factory Zone to learn how a simple cocoa bean is transformed into the finest chocolate. Here, you’ll discover the history of some of York’s famous chocolate brands, with the chance to reminisce over vintage flavours. Then it’s time to create handmade chocolates of your own, watching our chocolatiers as they showcase the art of chocolate making.

There’s plenty of time to enjoy your creations, but don’t forget to stop by our shop and cafe. Our chocolatiers produce some of the finest handmade chocolates available, from salted caramel to Iron-Bru flavours, plus a selection of the best chocolate products from York, Yorkshire and around the UK.

York

Brew York

We've a passion for beer and brewing and the setting of our brew house in the centre of York is almost as enjoyable as the beer itself. Converted from an old warehouse in Walmgate, our brewery lies within York's historic city walls, and is the place where we produce cask, keg and canned ales, which are sold throughout the UK.

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York

Brew York

brewyork.co.uk


We've a passion for beer and brewing and the setting of our brew house in the centre of York is almost as enjoyable as the beer itself. Converted from an old warehouse in Walmgate, our brewery lies within York's historic city walls, and is the place where we produce cask, keg and canned ales, which are sold throughout the UK.

Our Taproom, with its riverside garden, has been built alongside the Brewhouse to showcase our award-winning beers at their freshest. It's a particularly popular spot during our beer, music and food festivals. Try our original brew, Viking DNA, a nod to the heritage of the brewery, which was the original location of the Jorvik Viking centre. Or Imperial Tonkoko, recently voted the 7th best Stout in the world!

Our Beer Hall is a new addition to the venue and showcases 40 different beers, alongside some of the best home-made burgers, made fresh every day by Born to Lose Burger Kitchen.

You can also join one of our popular weekend tours, where one of our brewers will guide you through the brewing process, with the chance to enjoy some beer samples along the way.

York

York Pass

Get free entry to more than 40 York & Beyond Attractions with the York Pass, the city’s official sightseeing card. Available as an instant ticket that you can capture on your smartphone/device, or as hard copy that can be mailed to you or collected on arrival in the city, this is your passport to York.

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York

York Pass

yorkpass.com


Get free entry to more than 40 York & Beyond Attractions with the York Pass, the city’s official sightseeing card. Available as an instant ticket that you can capture on your smartphone/device, or as hard copy that can be mailed to you or collected on arrival in the city, this is your passport to York.

Passholders – adults and children – receive free entry at the included sights and attractions for a variety of periods, from one to six days, starting at £42 per adult and £28 per child. The passes are activated at the first attraction visited, and holders can also enjoy discounts to additional listed attractions, a 24-hour City Sightseeing bus ticket, and a pocket guidebook to the city. There are discounts on evening entertainment, such as ghost walks and escape rooms, plus money off at numerous cafes and restaurants across the city.

With 20 attractions within the city walls alone, including the Jorvik Viking Centre, York Minster and York Castle Museum, there is plenty to pack in using our York Pass. Beyond the city, Pass highlights include Helmsley Caste, Scarborough Castle, and the North Yorkshire Moors Railway.

York

Jorvik Viking Centre

Dig into the Viking age on an interactive journey through one of England's most important archaeological sites, where you'll be immersed in vividly recreated sights and sounds, even the smells, of 960 AD. Explore hundreds of artefacts, including carvings, pottery and human skeletons, uncovered by archaeologists here in the 1980s.

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York

Jorvik Viking Centre

jorvikvikingcentre.co.uk


Dig into the Viking age on an interactive journey through one of England's most important archaeological sites, where you'll be immersed in vividly recreated sights and sounds, even the smells, of 960 AD. Explore hundreds of artefacts, including carvings, pottery and human skeletons, uncovered by archaeologists here in the 1980s.

Learn how, on this very spot, an accidental discovery made by workmen led to the uncovering of the remains of the original Viking city of Jorvik. Beneath your feet, viewed through glass floors, lie a reconstruction of two well-preserved Viking houses that were found at the dig.

Board our special train and be transported back 1,000 years in time. On your travels around our reconstructed Viking streets, markets and dwellings (our special commentary will tell you all you need to know), you'll meet life-like, speaking animatronic figures, including craftspeople at work, children playing - and even a man using a rough-and-ready outdoor toilet. Take a look, too, at some of our incredible 40,000 archaeological finds. Souvenir replica versions are on sale in our gift shop, from drinking sets to chess pieces.

York

The Bar Convent

England's oldest operating Catholic convent has more than 300 years of history beneath its roof. Today, the Bar Convent is home to a community of nuns, with a café, gift shop and an exhibition illuminating its colourful past. We run an award-winning B&B here, too.

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York

The Bar Convent

bar-convent.org.uk


England's oldest operating Catholic convent has more than 300 years of history beneath its roof. Today, the Bar Convent is home to a community of nuns, with a café, gift shop and an exhibition illuminating its colourful past. We run an award-winning B&B here, too.

Step through the Victorian atrium to discover a story of courage, perseverance and prayer, including the tale of Mary Ward: don't miss the interactive exhibition on the life of this indomitable nun, whose pioneering work helped to educate women and girls across England and Europe.

If you're interested in religious history, the library has a collection of theological writings. You'll have to apply for permission in advance but it's worth it for resources that include antique books dating from the 15th century, and a fascinating collection of tomes by and about women in a religious context.

Built before Catholic Emancipation, the convent's secret gold and white Baroque chapel was constructed with eight doors and a priest's hole for quick escapes. Secrecy didn't mean skimping on decoration, though, and the rotunda is full of detailing; look up to see delicately rendered vine leaves, flower garlands and painted glass lanterns.

York

National Railway Museum

From the world's fastest steam locomotive to Queen Victoria's luxurious personal carriages - York's free-to-visit National Railway Museum is the place to get up close and personal with the technology that shaped the modern railway.

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York

National Railway Museum

railwaymuseum.org.uk


From the world's fastest steam locomotive to Queen Victoria's luxurious personal carriages - York's free-to-visit National Railway Museum is the place to get up close and personal with the technology that shaped the modern railway.

Meet legends of the railway, discover high-speed travel on the Japanese bullet train and find out fascinating facts at our daily talks and tours. Ride the miniature railway, join in with engineering shows and watch live turntable demonstrations.

Finish your trip in style with afternoon tea served in the Countess of York, our restored vintage dining carriage. Try homemade cakes, sandwiches and scones (baked to a traditional Yorkshire recipe), before popping into our shop, its shelves packed with everything from miniature trains to period posters - retail heaven for railway fans.

York

Dean Court Hotel

Commanding one of the finest positions in York, right opposite the Minster, Dean Court Hotel has an unrivalled location at the centre of this ancient city. Based in an historic red-brick building with contemporary style, we offer comfort, character - and an uplifting wake-up call with the morning peel of the Minster bells.

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York

Dean Court Hotel

deancourt-york.co.uk


Commanding one of the finest positions in York, right opposite the Minster, Dean Court Hotel has an unrivalled location at the centre of this ancient city. Based in an historic red-brick building with contemporary style, we offer comfort, character - and an uplifting wake-up call with the morning peel of the Minster bells.

Our hotel has just 40 bedrooms, including some at the front (don't worry, the Minster bells don't ring at night). For added luxury, book one of our two suites, both of which overlook the mighty church, and feature luxuries such as superking beds, calming mist sprays and flat-screen TVs.

Afternoon tea gets a Yorkshire twist here, with a unique take on this English tradition. Forget traditional cucumber sandwiches, our locally sourced spread includes Whitby crab, York ham hock and cakes such as Yorkshire parkin and curd tart - accompanied by a strong cup of local Rington's loose-leaf tea. Fresh local produce and classic and contemporary British dishes underpin our delicious lunch and dinner menus at our AA Rosette D.C.H restaurant.

York

York Marriott

On the edge of York, overlooking the city's racecourse, our elegant four-star hotel is set in 20,000 sq m of lush, landscaped gardens. Our restaurant, leisure club and spa will ensure of a supremely comfy stay, with all the comforts and high level of service that are expected of a renowned international hotel group.

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York

York Marriott

marriott.co.uk


On the edge of York, overlooking the city's racecourse, our elegant four-star hotel is set in 20,000 sq m of lush, landscaped gardens. Our restaurant, leisure club and spa will ensure of a supremely comfy stay, with all the comforts and high level of service that are expected of a renowned international hotel group.

To really set the scene, why not book a room with a view over the racecourse? But, whichever room you choose, you'll find high-speed internet access, and large flat-screen TVs with access to cable and premium movie channels, plus you'll enjoy complimentary on-site parking. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served in our Cast Iron Bar & Grill, where menus feature seasonally inspired dishes featuring local ingredients. Plus, there's a full bar with a choice of craft beers and cocktails.

Beat a retreat from the city and make the most of our excellent facilities. You can work up a sweat in the Leisure Club, where there's an indoor pool, outdoor tennis court and well-equipped gym. Then pamper yourself in our relaxing, full-service spa.

York

York Castle Museum

Explore hundreds of years of York’s history under one roof right in the centre of the city. Here at York Castle Museum, you can wander around recreated Jacobean dining rooms, meet infamous Victorian criminals, and travel back to the swinging Sixties.

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York

York Castle Museum

yorkcastlemuseum.org.uk


Explore hundreds of years of York’s history under one roof right in the centre of the city. Here at York Castle Museum, you can wander around recreated Jacobean dining rooms, meet infamous Victorian criminals, and travel back to the swinging Sixties.

Named for its location on the site of the former York Castle, York Castle Museum is housed in an intriguing building – a former debtors’ prison and adjoining women’s prison. Founded by Dr John Kirk, a doctor from Pickering, North Yorkshire, our galleries are the proud home of his extraordinary collection of social history, amassed in the early 20th century. One of the UK’s leading museums of everyday life, we showcase thousands of historic objects that reanimate the city’s past.

One of our most renowned displays is the reconstructed Victorian street, Kirkgate. A blueprint for museum displays worldwide, Kirkgate’s schoolroom, police cell, Hansom cab and cobbled street surface were created by Dr Kirk as the centrepiece of the museum when it opened in 1938, making it one of the world’s oldest indoor recreated streets. And there’s always an exciting temporary exhibition that’s worth catching, too.

York

Stillingfleet Lodge Gardens

Just six miles from historic York, our collection of small gardens surrounding our family home has been lovingly cultivated for more than 40 years. Here at Stillingfleet, you can enjoy our efforts, admiring eye-catching herbaceous borders that change with the seasons and attract many bird and insect species.

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York

Stillingfleet Lodge Gardens

stillingfleetlodgenurseries.co.uk


Just six miles from historic York, our collection of small gardens surrounding our family home has been lovingly cultivated for more than 40 years. Here at Stillingfleet, you can enjoy our efforts, admiring eye-catching herbaceous borders that change with the seasons and attract many bird and insect species.

Our planting is done in the cottage-garden style, all maintained organically. We leave seed heads as bird food and limit cutting back to promote insect life. The gardens open out into an avenue that leads to a perennial wildflower meadow, while our Rill Garden, with its minimalistic planting, will please the eye of those who love a formal design. In August, it plays host to a sculpture exhibition featuring artists working in a variety of materials.

You'll also find local art in our tearoom, located within our lovely renovated barn: a great place to sit, relax and enjoy the peace, and some of our homemade cakes. Many of the plants in the garden are available to buy in our well-stocked nursery. Find out, too, about our courses and workshops aimed at gardeners of all levels.

York

Parsonage Hotel & Spa

The Parsonage Hotel offers the best of both worlds. Set in beautiful landscape gardens and woodland in the small village of Escrick only six miles from York, you'll have easy access to the historic city and can return to the Parsonage to be pampered like a country squire, thanks to our top leisure facilities and fine dining.

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York

Parsonage Hotel & Spa

parsonagehotel.co.uk


The Parsonage Hotel offers the best of both worlds. Set in beautiful landscape gardens and woodland in the small village of Escrick only six miles from York, you'll have easy access to the historic city and can return to the Parsonage to be pampered like a country squire, thanks to our top leisure facilities and fine dining.

Our hotel's history is evident throughout. Built in the early 1840s, it has retained its fine Victorian looks and many of its original features; some of our 56 rooms include four-poster beds if you're looking for extra luxury.

Unwind at our Cloisters Spa and Health Club, where you can pick from a range of treatments, laze around or do laps in the pool, workout in our state-of-the-art gym, then revive yourself in the sauna, steam and aromatherapy rooms.(Guests 18 and over)

Hungry? Head to the Fat Abbot for great gastro pub food, a roaring fire, cask ales and a friendly welcome. For something more sophisticated, take a table in our Lascelles Restaurant, where locally sourced dishes are served in style. And for a proper treat, retire to our elegant Drawing Room or find a sunny spot in our gardens for a traditional Yorkshire afternoon tea.

Leeds

Leeds Marriott

In the heart of Leeds, opposite buzzing Trinity Shopping Centre, our historic, four-star hotel is a great base from which to explore the city and Yorkshire beyond. We've 236 comfortable and well-equipped rooms to choose from, plus a leisure club and choice of dining options.

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Leeds

Leeds Marriott


In the heart of Leeds, opposite buzzing Trinity Shopping Centre, our historic, four-star hotel is a great base from which to explore the city and Yorkshire beyond. We've 236 comfortable and well-equipped rooms to choose from, plus a leisure club and choice of dining options.

All our rooms have flat-screen TVs, premium satellite and high-speed Wi-Fi, plus tea- and coffee-making facilities and comfy pillowtop mattresses. Choose an Executive Level room and you'll benefit from access to our Executive Lounge, as well as other perks.

Our AM Kitchen & Bar offers Indian dining in a distinctive location in the old Dyson Clockwork Building. Or enjoy the steakhouse-style of our on-site Cast Iron Bar & Grill, a popular place to wind down with a cocktail at the end of the day. If you really need to let off steam, then enjoy our complimentary leisure club, home to the largest indoor swimming pool in Leeds, a modern fitness centre, steam room and sauna.

Leeds

Hazlewood Castle

History oozes out of every stone at Hazlewood Castle. This Norman estate, now a luxury castle hotel and spa, has been owned by the Vavasour family for more than 800 years; it was mentioned in the Domesday Book, has witnessed the bloodiest battle on English soil, and even had a stint as a maternity hospital - some 1,500 babies were born here.

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Leeds

Hazlewood Castle

ashdalehotels.com


History oozes out of every stone at Hazlewood Castle. This Norman estate, now a luxury castle hotel and spa, has been owned by the Vavasour family for more than 800 years; it was mentioned in the Domesday Book, has witnessed the bloodiest battle on English soil, and even had a stint as a maternity hospital - some 1,500 babies were born here.

Enjoy Hazlewood Castle's latest chapter by checking yourself in. You'll feel a little like royalty while lazing in one of our 32 individually styled rooms - each named after a flower or local character, each gazing over the cherry orchard, the gallops, or our 77 acres of woodland.

There's more to our hotel, though, than a good view - it's an adventure playground. Follow one of our biking or hiking trails through the trees, or try something completely different at our activity centre, which offers everything from archery to axe-throwing.

After all that, relax. Sink into our spa for a manicure, massage or mud serail. Then dine at our Vavasour Restaurant - tuck into delicious food within these ancient stone walls, and raise a glass of award-winning wine, produced on our family vineyard, to a great break.

Selby

The Escapologist

Are you ready for a challenge? Then head to Selby's steam-punk escape rooms, bar and restaurant. The flagship of three Escapologist locations in Yorkshire, our Selby site is where you'll find our original escape experiences, inspired by such magical movie series as Game of Thrones and Pirates of the Caribbean.

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Selby

The Escapologist

the-escapologist.com


Are you ready for a challenge? Then head to Selby's steam-punk escape rooms, bar and restaurant. The flagship of three Escapologist locations in Yorkshire, our Selby site is where you'll find our original escape experiences, inspired by such magical movie series as Game of Thrones and Pirates of the Caribbean.

Set in the shadows of the Selby Abbey, our Spoils of Stormborn escape room challenges you to wander into a medieval world embroiled with wars waged, dragons hatched, and revenge fuelled kingdoms. Who will take the throneÉ.. that's down to you? Or perhaps you're not a landlubber? Then immerse yourself in our Anarchy of the Seas escape room. Or try to flee from Xsylophobia, in our forest of fears room.

Get some Dutch courage, or your victor's reward, in our retro-futuristic bar that basks in the warm glow of hundreds of vintage bulbs. Their shadowy illuminations pick out a moving wall, mechanical spiders and ventricular maze of steel, copper piping and a plethora of gauges at the centre of which The Escapologist's industrial ‘marvel of a machine' produces fantastical coffees, cocktails and mocktails.

Doncaster

Cusworth Hall & Park

Cusworth Hall offers a great, green gulp of fresh air close to industrious Doncaster. This beautiful Grade I-listed Georgian country house sits in acres of wildlife-rich and historic parkland. Free to visit, it’s a welcoming place where you can discover local stories, stretch your legs and even enjoy a pint brewed on site.

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Doncaster

Cusworth Hall & Park

doncaster.gov.uk


Cusworth Hall offers a great, green gulp of fresh air close to industrious Doncaster. This beautiful Grade I-listed Georgian country house sits in acres of wildlife-rich and historic parkland. Free to visit, it’s a welcoming place where you can discover local stories, stretch your legs and even enjoy a pint brewed on site.

Recently restored, Cusworth Hall is now a social-history museum, a place to uncover how the people of South Yorkshire have lived, worked and played for 200 or more years. You can even taste its history in The Old Brewhouse microbrewery and bar, the transformed space where the hall’s previous inhabitants sought refreshment for centuries.

The extensive parkland is everyone’s playground. We’ve history trails for you to follow, and you can head off in search of water voles, kingfishers and the many other species that scuttle and chirrup amid Cusworth’s woodlands, lakes and meadows. Or just relax for a while: bring a picnic, walk your dog, and let the kids loose on the play area.

Doncaster

Rossington Hall

Rossington Hall is a Victorian stately home revived. Having fallen into disrepair, this Grade II-listed South Yorkshire estate needed some tender, loving care. So we've returned it to its former glory and flung wide its doors for weddings and events, first-class dining and truly special overnight stays. It becomes your stately home for the day (or for the weekend).

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Doncaster

Rossington Hall

rossingtonhall.co.uk


Rossington Hall is a Victorian stately home revived. Having fallen into disrepair, this Grade II-listed South Yorkshire estate needed some tender, loving care. So we've returned it to its former glory and flung wide its doors for weddings and events, first-class dining and truly special overnight stays. It becomes your stately home for the day (or for the weekend).

The historic part of the house was completed in 1882 and has had many of its original features restored; you can still enter through the doors of the striking portico. Take a seat in the library or conservatory restaurant, where we serve delicious a la carte or our seven-course tasting menu. Retire to the drawing room for post-dinner drinks or simply to relax.

Sweep up the grand staircase to reach our 19 luxury bedrooms, where you can sleep with a sense of Victorian refinement. Each one has antique fabrics and furnishings but also contemporary touches and impressive bathrooms.

The estate's 250 acres of grounds have also been lovingly restored. Stroll across the rolling lawns, inhale the scent of the roses, walk along the rhododendron path to the lily pond or sit awhile in the Italian Sunken Garden.

Derbyshire

Creswell Crags

Gain a unique insight into the world during the Ice Age at these caves hidden within the magnesian limestone gorge of Creswell Crags on the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire border. A Site of Special Interest, they contain the northernmost discovery of Prehistoric cave art in Europe and only example of cave art in the UK. Find out more at our archaeological sites, museum and visitors' centre.

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Derbyshire

Creswell Crags

creswell-crags.org.uk


Gain a unique insight into the world during the Ice Age at these caves hidden within the magnesian limestone gorge of Creswell Crags on the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire border. A Site of Special Interest, they contain the northernmost discovery of Prehistoric cave art in Europe and only example of cave art in the UK. Find out more at our archaeological sites, museum and visitors' centre.

Discover the subterranean secrets of four of Creswell's caves on a cave tour. Put on a helmet and become an explorer: delve into the past and learn about the life of Ice Age people at the most Northerly point that could be reached - and see walls decorated with pictorial representations from bison and deer to abstract marks created by Ice Age artists.

Excavations at Creswell Crags have been so fruitful that artefacts found here are now displayed in 37 museums in England, Scotland and Ireland. The collection here reveals some of the best finds - including a baby hyena skeleton, bear bones and an impressive array of hand axes and flints.

The area around Creswell Crags is full of marked walking trails and natural wonders. Try one of our bat walks or watch birds, including Peregrine Falcons. And if you're visiting in spring or summer, you can spot 22 different species of butterfly dancing over woodland carpets of bluebells and primroses.

Derbyshire

Renishaw Hall & Gardens

Home to the Sitwell family for nearly 400 years and still very much a family home, Renishaw Hall reveals a rich artistic legacy, one of the world’s most northerly vineyards, the country’s greatest Italianate gardens, and an enviable position in the Derbyshire countryside.

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Derbyshire

Renishaw Hall & Gardens

renishaw-hall.co.uk


Home to the Sitwell family for nearly 400 years and still very much a family home, Renishaw Hall reveals a rich artistic legacy, one of the world’s most northerly vineyards, the country’s greatest Italianate gardens, and an enviable position in the Derbyshire countryside.

Take a guided tour to discover more about our eclectic country house and its most famous residents, including the literary trio of Edith, Osbert and Sacheverell Sitwell. All were dedicated patrons of the arts, and you can browse items from their private collections, as well as displays of letters, books and other artefacts, at the Sitwell Museum.

Outside, our Italianate Gardens will transport you across the Continent. Promenade down the lime avenue, between the ornamental ponds and classical statues, take a seat by the fountain, admire the explosions of camellias and roses, and find peace in our secret garden rooms.

Explore a little further to seek out our temple and stroll around the lake, which is alive with butterflies, dragonflies and birds. Our vineyard is award-winning; book a tour and you can learn how we create our still and sparkling wines – and sample them, too.

Derbyshire

Peak Cycling

Peak Cycling will help you explore the best of Derbyshire and the Peak District - the UK's first national park - on two wheels. From thigh-testing road climbs to gnarly mountain-bike descents and expert tuition for beginners, we'll ensure you have a great ride.

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Derbyshire

Peak Cycling

peakcyclinguk.com


Peak Cycling will help you explore the best of Derbyshire and the Peak District - the UK's first national park - on two wheels. From thigh-testing road climbs to gnarly mountain-bike descents and expert tuition for beginners, we'll ensure you have a great ride.

Find a route to suit: go on road, off-road, up gravel trails and down charming country lanes - making time to stop for tea and a Bakewell tart, too. Our range of guided rides is designed for all types of cyclist, whether you're a nervous novice or a pedalling pro.

Start with one of our family-friendly Blue rides, on either Tarmac or trail. Enjoy a leisurely cycle, soaking up the scenery. Our Red routes are a bit tougher, taking you deeper into the Peak District to tackle stiffer climbs and more technical terrain.

Brave our Black routes for the biggest challenge. Take on the mountain-bike playground of Dark Peak, for classic drops and rocky trails. Or spend a full day in the saddle, exploring the national park and even testing yourself against Tour of Britain ascents.

Lincoln

International Bomber Command Centre

What was it like to be in Bomber Command during the Second World War? To take part in these dangerous operations and to deal with the difficult aftermath? Opened in spring 2018, the International Bomber Command Centre is the only place in the world to tell that story, and memorialise all those who lost their lives.

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Lincoln

International Bomber Command Centre

internationalbcc.co.uk


What was it like to be in Bomber Command during the Second World War? To take part in these dangerous operations and to deal with the difficult aftermath? Opened in spring 2018, the International Bomber Command Centre is the only place in the world to tell that story, and memorialise all those who lost their lives.

We are a centre for reconciliation, recognition and remembrance. Here, you can listen to first-hand stories from those involved on all sides, move around our immersive and interactive exhibition galleries, and join a free tour with one of our experienced guides to gain a deeper insight into the troubled legacy of this period.

Take your time to explore our 10-acre Peace Gardens. You'll find the UK's tallest war memorial and the names of all those who lost their lives in Bomber Command here. But you'll also find quiet, contemplative spaces where you can stroll amid the native trees, enjoy views over the historic city of Lincoln and pause for your own moment of remembrance.

Lincoln

Little Redlands B&B

Stay the night at our independent bed and breakfast, a renovated heritage Victorian villa on the outskirts of Lincoln. As you arrive through our private gated entrance, our Gothic-inspired mansion is bound to impress, with its double arched doorway and striking turret, adorned with 52 stained-glass picture windows.

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Lincoln

Little Redlands B&B

littleredlands.co.uk


Stay the night at our independent bed and breakfast, a renovated heritage Victorian villa on the outskirts of Lincoln. As you arrive through our private gated entrance, our Gothic-inspired mansion is bound to impress, with its double arched doorway and striking turret, adorned with 52 stained-glass picture windows.

Relax in one of three spacious period bedrooms, where original fireplaces, corniced ceilings and antique furniture blend seamlessly with top-of-the-range modern conveniences and technology. Sleep soundly beneath Egyptian cotton sheets and goose-down duvets, and wake to the daylight flooding through coloured glass, and refresh with a rainfall shower or a soak in a slipper bath.

Our locally sourced breakfast is served in our Turret dining room, where you can enjoy all-round views of our garden and grounds (we've a croquet pitch on the lawn) before setting off for a day's exploration of Lincoln, its cathedral and the surrounding area. Then return to unwind in our large period drawing room, where you can curl up with a good book on a Chesterfield armchair by the fireside.

Lincoln

Stokes Lawn Café

When Robert Stokes started roasting coffee and blending teas back in 1902, he set up shop in a little grocer’s on Lincoln’s Guildhall Street. More than a century later, our family business has blossomed with three cafes across the city including our newest venue, The Lawn Café.

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Lincoln

Stokes Lawn Café

stokes-coffee.co.uk


When Robert Stokes started roasting coffee and blending teas back in 1902, he set up shop in a little grocer’s on Lincoln’s Guildhall Street. More than a century later, our family business has blossomed with three cafes across the city including our newest venue, The Lawn Café.

This exciting new space is more than just a cafe. Step into the Lawn’s viewing gallery to see our celebrated selection of coffee beans being roasted and packed, a place where bright new baristas are also put through their paces, learning how to make the perfect brew on one of our amateur and professional courses. Or take a seat in our new Blue Room, a beautifully restored Edwardian performance space that plays host to everything from cabaret to live music, and yoga classes.

Fine coffees and expertly blended teas, of course, remain at the heart of what we do, the perfect companion to exemplary menus of afternoon teas, brunch and lunch. And just like our other cafes – including the original Stokes High Bridge branch, in a 16th-century, half-timbered building spanning the River Witham – you can expect an atmospheric location. Set in an ornate hospital building that dates back to 1819, The Lawn is a place to come and be taken care of, a good cuppa in hand.

Southwell

Southwell Minster

There are 42 cathedrals in England and, of them, Nottinghamshire's Southwell Minster may well be the best-kept secret. Rising from the leafy suburbs of the beautiful Georgian market town - unlike most other cathedrals, which are in cities - free-to-visit Southwell Minster dates back almost 1,000 years, and is a place of history, art and peace.

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Southwell

Southwell Minster

southwellminster.org


There are 42 cathedrals in England and, of them, Nottinghamshire's Southwell Minster may well be the best-kept secret. Rising from the leafy suburbs of the beautiful Georgian market town - unlike most other cathedrals, which are in cities - free-to-visit Southwell Minster dates back almost 1,000 years, and is a place of history, art and peace.

Set in England's smallest Cathedral town you'll be awed by the scale of the huge Norman nave, as well as the beauty of the stained-glass windows; look for the moving memorial window that honours those from both sides who died in the First World War. Then admire the Leaves of Southwell - these naturalistic 13th-century stone carvings in the Chapter House are among the finest in Europe.

Head next door to the Archbishop's Palace to immerse yourself in royal intrigue. Cardinal Wolsey lived here at the end of his life, after failing to arrange Henry VIII's divorce from Catherine of Aragon; it's also where Charles I surrendered during the English Civil War.

Wander our new Education Garden - complete with Medieval parterre, Tudor knot garden and Victorian beds - to get up-close to the palace ruins, trace the site's timeline through horticulture, and relax in the beauty of nature.

Newark

Thoresby Park

Our grand English country estate has a host of attractions to excite the whole family. Visit our Victorian courtyard to see the military museum, art gallery and shops, and roam our vast expanse of unspoiled countryside, set amid the ancient woods of Sherwood Forest.

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Newark

Thoresby Park

whatsonatthoresby.co.uk


Our grand English country estate has a host of attractions to excite the whole family. Visit our Victorian courtyard to see the military museum, art gallery and shops, and roam our vast expanse of unspoiled countryside, set amid the ancient woods of Sherwood Forest.

At the heart of our estate is Thoresby Hall, a magnificent 19th-century country house now enjoyed by guests at the Warner's hotel within its walls. The cobbled Thoresby Courtyard is home to The Queen's Royal Lancers and Nottinghamshire Yeomanry Museum, where you can uncover some of the thrilling secrets of the British cavalry. There's a gallery here, too, which displays the works of Marie-Louise Roosevelt Pierrepont, who lived at the hall in the early 20th century, also showing work by local artists.

In the courtyard's boutiques, you'll find more art in action, with working craftspeople, such as jewellers and glass blowers, displaying their skills - buy one of their creations as a special souvenir. After a bite to eat in The Bay Tree Cafe, step out in the parkland, with its ancient oaks, on a 2.5km circular walk on an accessible path, which dips into the woods and calls by the banks of the River Meden and St. John's Church in Perlethorpe.

Newark

Sherwood Forest Explorer Tours

Venture back in time to discover legendary Sherwood Forest and The Major Oak on one of our exclusive private experiences. Leave the crowds behind and let expert archaeologists and historians reveal in vivid detail the hidden history and myths of this beautiful forest. It really is a landscape of legends.

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Newark

Sherwood Forest Explorer Tours

culturalheritageuk.com


Venture back in time to discover legendary Sherwood Forest and The Major Oak on one of our exclusive private experiences. Leave the crowds behind and let expert archaeologists and historians reveal in vivid detail the hidden history and myths of this beautiful forest. It really is a landscape of legends.

As we lead you on foot beneath a canopy of ancient oak trees on our half- or full-day tours of Sherwood Forest National Reserve we will tell you tales of foresters, outlaws and kings, hunting and everyday life in the time of Robin Hood. And you'll hear about the ballads and legends of one of the most famous figures in medieval English history and their links to the surrounding landscape of oak forest and heather-clad heathland
Other private guided tour options, including small-group and longer tours, over a number of days, or combining other destinations such as Nottingham can be arranged on request. The landscape around Sherwood Forest is home to an original copy of the Magna Carta, the origins of the Mayflower Pilgrim, plus there are stately homes and a ruined abbey, as well as rock art dating from the Ice Age carved in ancient limestone caves nearby.

Newark

Museum Of Timekeeping

The science and craft of timekeeping through the centuries is the theme of our collection of some 10,000 items including clocks, watches and other timekeeping devices of which over 400 are on display. From the first electric timepiece to the watch used by Captain Scott on his ill-fated Antarctic expedition, there is much to admire here.

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Newark

Museum Of Timekeeping

museumoftimekeeping.org.uk


The science and craft of timekeeping through the centuries is the theme of our collection of some 10,000 items including clocks, watches and other timekeeping devices of which over 400 are on display. From the first electric timepiece to the watch used by Captain Scott on his ill-fated Antarctic expedition, there is much to admire here.

Pause to listen to the voice of the General Post Office's first speaking clock and see the workings of the original machine, still functioning today. View clocks that once graced England's iconic public buildings, including London's St Pancras railway station.

As you set your imagination whirring through the history of time, our expert volunteers will be on hand to share historic anecdotes and facts about the exhibits, from minuscule mechanisms and examples of precision engineering to colossal constructions.

Make time, too, to explore the grounds and grandeur of Upton Hall, the early 19th-century mansion that has housed the headquarters of British Horological Institute, the award-winning museum and world-renowned horological library for nearly half a century.

Newark

Carriages Café

Set within the Italianate-style building of Newark Castle Station, Carriages is a cafe with a difference. Located on platform one, Carriages is designed to promote social eating, it's a place that encourages people to engage with each other in a friendly environment.

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Newark

Carriages Café

carriagesnewark.co.uk


Set within the Italianate-style building of Newark Castle Station, Carriages is a cafe with a difference. Located on platform one, Carriages is designed to promote social eating, it's a place that encourages people to engage with each other in a friendly environment.

Built in 1846, our decor takes a Victorian theme that is both quirky and interesting with artwork and curios adorning the walls and floors. Our steampunk inspired licenced bar area in the dining room offers freshly prepared food and drink and a separate kitchen that delivers tasty hot meals throughout the day. Our menus of coffee and cakes to delicious meals cater for vegetarian, vegan and gluten free diets. Take it away or, better still, stay a while and enjoy your food in our elegant café. We have parking available and adjacent to the station, which is located a 5-minute walk from the centre of Newark.

What's more, our weekly community cafe on Wednesday's serves up delicious meals made from surplus supermarket food, helping to avoid food waste. For just £3, you can tuck into a delicious three-course meal created from these contributions, knowing you're doing your bit to tackle food waste at the same time.

Newark

Kelham Hall

The ancestral home of the Manners-Sutton family, our historic hall is a masterpiece of high Victorian Gothic architecture. Come and explore this intriguing building and its beautiful grounds and woodland, and take a tour to discover the stories that lie behind its grand facade.

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Newark

Kelham Hall

kelham-hall.com


The ancestral home of the Manners-Sutton family, our historic hall is a masterpiece of high Victorian Gothic architecture. Come and explore this intriguing building and its beautiful grounds and woodland, and take a tour to discover the stories that lie behind its grand facade.

Kelham's asymmetrical outline and crowning ‘grandiloquent' towers were designed by the eminent Victorian architect Sir George Gilbert Scott in 1863 and inspired his later work on London's St Pancras Station. This place has played different roles through time. It was a theological college for an Anglican Order of Monks in the early 1900s and played an important role in the Second World War. Take our Secret Lives of Kelham Hall tour and local historians will reveal these stories and more about Kelham's previous inhabitants and incarnations.

In summer, you can take another guided tour, this time in the grounds, along the River Trent, which runs through the property. Our Kelham Discovery Tour explores the gardens and country park, including a visit to the Monk's Grave Yard, Riverside Meadow & Woodland, with fantastic views of the Hall. Then reward yourself with afternoon tea in our elegant State Rooms.

Newark

National Civil War Centre

See some of England’s bloodiest battles brought to life at Nottinghamshire’s National Civil War Centre. A staunchly Royalist town in the 1600s, the struggle to control Newark was a defining moment in the English Civil War. Our HD cinema and interactive exhibits vividly animate Newark’s past, while live performances re-enact key scenes from the era, and our collection of costumes and armour make for a unique family photo.

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Newark

National Civil War Centre

nationalcivilwarcentre.com


See some of England’s bloodiest battles brought to life at Nottinghamshire’s National Civil War Centre. A staunchly Royalist town in the 1600s, the struggle to control Newark was a defining moment in the English Civil War. Our HD cinema and interactive exhibits vividly animate Newark’s past, while live performances re-enact key scenes from the era, and our collection of costumes and armour make for a unique family photo.

Our Augmented Reality Trails tell Civil War stories via apps that trigger Hollywood-style film clips at different locations around the museum. Immerse yourself in the 360-degree panoramic of Newark Castle during the Civil War, and try the action-packed interactive game. The Royal Cavalry and Civil War Spy trails will embroil you in exciting dramas. Plus there’s a trail for little ones led by Boye the dog, whose master is the famed Royalist commander, Prince Rupert.

Our regularly changing exhibitions feature historic artefacts, and you can follow our National Civil War Trail through the streets, using augmented reality footage to tell Civil War stories at sights including Newark Castle, St Mary Magdalene Church and the historic Queen’s Sconce, one of the last of its kind in the UK.

Newark

Newark Castle & Gardens

Newark’s castle and dungeons have stood on the banks of the River Trent for almost 900 years. Come and explore this ancient place and its lovely gardens. Visit during summer and you can also take in one of the free concerts and festivals we hold in the grounds.

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Newark

Newark Castle & Gardens

newark-sherwooddc.gov.uk


Newark’s castle and dungeons have stood on the banks of the River Trent for almost 900 years. Come and explore this ancient place and its lovely gardens. Visit during summer and you can also take in one of the free concerts and festivals we hold in the grounds.

With the largest gateway of any castle in England, our imposing 12th-century fortress once belonged to King John. It was here that the reluctant signatory of the Magna Carta died in 1216. Let our Castle Rangers lead you around the battlements and dungeons on a tour that brings history to life, and visit the free-to-enter Gilstrap Heritage Centre to learn more about the castle’s role in Newark’s history.

Newark Castle was a strategic royal seat during the Middle Ages and English Civil War. Today, it’s a great location from which to embark on numerous country walks along the River Trent and Fosse Way, calling by many pretty local villages.

Newark

Brecks B&B

Enjoy total tranquillity in the heart of the Nottinghamshire countryside at Brecks Cottage B&B. For more than 20 years we've been welcoming overnight guests to our family home, a lovely 17th-century cottage. And many visitors return regularly to savour the peace and quiet, beautiful views and relaxing atmosphere.

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Newark

Brecks B&B

breckscottage.co.uk


Enjoy total tranquillity in the heart of the Nottinghamshire countryside at Brecks Cottage B&B. For more than 20 years we've been welcoming overnight guests to our family home, a lovely 17th-century cottage. And many visitors return regularly to savour the peace and quiet, beautiful views and relaxing atmosphere.

Choose between four tastefully appointed en-suite bedrooms, two in the main house and two in the converted barn, all combining old-world charm with modern facilities. Relax in comfort and enjoy a quiet night's sleep, then wake to the sound of birdsong in the morning, before tucking into our delicious, healthy breakfast, freshly cooked and featuring eggs from our own hens. Suitably set up for the day, you can then head off into the surrounding countryside to discover a slice of rural England that has remained virtually unchanged for centuries.

We're always happy to point you in the direction of our favourite attractions and good local places to eat, including some excellent country pubs that are just a short drive or pleasant walk away. Alternatively, take advantage of the dining area in our large summerhouse and order in a take-away meal to enjoy here at home.

Grantham

Easton Walled Garden

Easton has been in our family for more than 400 years and is a superlative example of an English country garden. Packed with scented flowers, we're a 12-acre sanctuary set deep in the folds of rolling Lincolnshire countryside which President Franklin D Roosevelt described as Òa dream of Nirvana...almost too good to be trueÓ.

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Grantham

Easton Walled Garden

visiteaston.co.uk


Easton has been in our family for more than 400 years and is a superlative example of an English country garden. Packed with scented flowers, we're a 12-acre sanctuary set deep in the folds of rolling Lincolnshire countryside which President Franklin D Roosevelt described as Òa dream of Nirvana...almost too good to be trueÓ.
Over the centuries, the Cholmeley family and their gardeners created a park, moved a river and built bridges, walls and ornamental outbuildings. The garden layout is largely Tudor and Jacobean and even survived the destruction of the house following requisition by the army during WWII. By the mid-1990's, with walls collapsing and every building at risk, we began our restoration project with clearing and planting.

Reborn in the 21st century, the gardens have transformed from a work in progress to a working garden, with a turf maze, yew tunnel, unusual rose garden and cut flower and vegetable gardens to explore, alongside a fruiting orchard, orchid meadows and 20,000 spring flowering bulbs.

A traditional rural estate, Easton also offers boutique self-catering, where guests can enjoy the gardens once the public visitors have left for the day, and a luxurious spa where our experienced beautician offers treatments such as facials, massage and reflexology.

Grantham

Grantham Museum

For a modest Lincolnshire town, Grantham packs quite a punch with its prodigal sons and daughters; 17th-century scientist Isaac Newton was born in nearby Woolsthorpe By Colsterworth and the late British Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher was born and raised here. At our volunteer-run museum we cherish the town’s heritage with displays on these famous former inhabitants.

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Grantham

Grantham Museum

granthammuseum.org.uk


For a modest Lincolnshire town, Grantham packs quite a punch with its prodigal sons and daughters; 17th-century scientist Isaac Newton was born in nearby Woolsthorpe By Colsterworth and the late British Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher was born and raised here. At our volunteer-run museum we cherish the town’s heritage with displays on these famous former inhabitants.

Britain’s first female Prime Minister was born in Grantham in 1925. Find out about her early life in the town and her rise through the political world, which would change the course of the UK. We’ll take you back in time to 1979 with our living-room mock-up, where you can experience the moment of her election victory, watching TV broadcasts and considering her manifesto.

Newton, who ‘discovered’ gravity when an apple fell on his head as he sat under a tree in the garden at his home near Grantham, is remembered in our recreation of the apothecary shop he lived above. Look out for a copy of Principia, his death mask and an interactive map showing places he would have known that you can still see in the modern town.

Grantham

Belton House

Set in formal Italian and Dutch gardens with views across an ancient deer park, Belton House is described as the quintessential English country house. With its symmetry and stately elegance, the former home of the Brownlow and Cust families set the standard for architects of grand estates across the country.

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Grantham

Belton House

nationaltrust.org.uk


Set in formal Italian and Dutch gardens with views across an ancient deer park, Belton House is described as the quintessential English country house. With its symmetry and stately elegance, the former home of the Brownlow and Cust families set the standard for architects of grand estates across the country.

The tastes, and wealth, that crafted Belton into such a pre-eminent English country home fill its rooms with 17th- and 18th-century portraiture, Sevres porcelain, and even Britain’s first road map. However, the estate’s public face is only half the story – take a Below Stairs tour to find out about the retinue of servants that kept the mansion running.

Outside, the formal gardens and grounds were Belton’s calling card – and an ever-changing treat according to the seasons. In spring, daffodils and pale-yellow primroses carpet the fields, giving way to bluebells in May. One constant is the park’s fallow deer herd; direct descendants of those that grazed here in 1690.

In contrast to the house’s formality, Lincolnshire's largest outdoor adventure playground sits in the grounds – a confection of tree houses, towers, zip wires and water fountains. It’s muddy stuff, but kids can dry off on a train ride through the adventure playground, to the woods and back.

Grantham

Belvoir Castle

Classically beautiful, phonetically challenging, Belvoir (pronounced “beaver”) Castle has been the seat of the Dukes of Rutland for centuries. First built on land gifted by William the Conqueror, this is the fourth iteration of a fortification on the site – and a confection of sumptuous rooms, gardens and sweeping parkland.

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Grantham

Belvoir Castle

belvoircastle.com


Classically beautiful, phonetically challenging, Belvoir (pronounced “beaver”) Castle has been the seat of the Dukes of Rutland for centuries. First built on land gifted by William the Conqueror, this is the fourth iteration of a fortification on the site – and a confection of sumptuous rooms, gardens and sweeping parkland.

A 16km perimeter walk encircles two square kilometres of gardens, 61,000 sq m of lakes and a vast parkland designed by the 18th-century horticulturalist Capability Brown. We offer bespoke tours on request – or you could just stride out and enjoy his naturalistic style for yourself.

You’ll find it hard to pick a favourite among Belvoir’s rooms, each unique in style, from Gothic Revival to Louise XIV; their walls are filled with paintings by Rubens, Poussin, Reynolds and Stubbs. The hot tickets are the tours of the private side of the castle, which are held periodically through the open season.

Head to the Engine Yard, a community hub where local artisans sell their products. Stock up on cheese, plants and clothing or watch a talk or food demonstration. You can while away a whole day here, with lunch in the café, followed by a treatment at the Yard’s most recent addition, the Belvoir Casa Spa.

Grantham

Angel & Royal

In the heart of the historic market town of Grantham, on the edge of the beautiful Vale of Belvoir, you'll find The Angel & Royal, reputed to be the oldest inn in England. For centuries, this was a staging post for coaches travelling along The Explorer's Road, now it's a restful place for you to stay the night.

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Grantham

Angel & Royal

angelandroyal.co.uk/


In the heart of the historic market town of Grantham, on the edge of the beautiful Vale of Belvoir, you'll find The Angel & Royal, reputed to be the oldest inn in England. For centuries, this was a staging post for coaches travelling along The Explorer's Road, now it's a restful place for you to stay the night.

Stop here and you'll be following in the footsteps of royalty: our inn has welcomed many monarchs over the years, including Richard lll, who signed the death warrant for the Duke of Buckingham, his rebellious cousin, in what is now Kings Room restaurant.

On the building's ancient faade you can admire the gilded wooden angel and stone carvings; inside you can enjoy a drop of local ale in the bar and keep cosy in the winter by an open fire in the big stone hearth. Then retire to one of our 31 bedrooms, each different (some have four-poster beds) but all equipped with every mod-con a 21st-century traveller would expect.

It's a great base from which to explore this pretty little corner of the country, with Lincolnshire's lovely landscapes, grand country homes and gardens, peaceful woodland walks and riverside strolls on our doorstep.

Grantham

Bull at Rippingale

Experience a quintessential English village pub and a true taste of life in the heart of a rural community. The Bull Inn is the ideal place to call in to after a country walk or after visiting one of the many Lincolnshire based attractions.

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Grantham

Bull at Rippingale

thebullrippingale.co.uk


Experience a quintessential English village pub and a true taste of life in the heart of a rural community. The Bull Inn is the ideal place to call in to after a country walk or after visiting one of the many Lincolnshire based attractions.

Our friendly inn is loved by locals and visitors alike. We offer a wide choice of real ales on tap and great pub grub, including a traditional English Sunday lunch in our carvery. You will always be made very welcome and we are both child and dog friendly.

It was here that local farmer, Henry Burtt, came up with the idea for the world's longest-running soap opera, The Archers. Now in its 68th year, this BBC radio show is a British institution, and its fictional pub is also called The Bull, just like our own inn. Stay a while longer by checking in to one of our five bedrooms - we've single, double and triple rooms. They've stylish décor, big beds and all mod cons.

Rippingale is a great base from which to visit Grimsthorpe Castle, Lincoln and Peterborough Cathedrals, and directly opposite our inn is the parish church of St Andrew, which contains relics dating back to the Crusades.

Oakham

Oakham Castle

Dating back to 1180, Oakham Castle is the finest surviving example of Norman domestic architecture in Europe and has the most complete Norman Great Hall in England. Grand banquets and court gatherings, attended by nobles and kings, were once held under its soaring, wood-beamed roof; today, it's a grand venue for free family discovery and fun.

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Oakham

Oakham Castle

oakhamcastle.org


Dating back to 1180, Oakham Castle is the finest surviving example of Norman domestic architecture in Europe and has the most complete Norman Great Hall in England. Grand banquets and court gatherings, attended by nobles and kings, were once held under its soaring, wood-beamed roof; today, it's a grand venue for free family discovery and fun.

The Castle is known for its astonishing collection of 230 huge golden ceremonial horseshoes, some up to 5ft tall, donated over the centuries by Royalty and Peers of the Realm. Admire the expansive display while discovering the unique stories behind each one - including horseshoes given by Elizabeth II, Queen Victoria, Edward IV and the Duke of Wellington.

Learn more from our team of volunteer guides, who will fill you in on the castle's 12th-century sculptures and its history of crime and punishment - court sittings have been taking place here since 1208, and still continue to this day, making the Castle one of the longest continuously running courts in the country.

Find the Castle just off Oakham's Market Place, where Castle Lane leads to a 2-acre peaceful grassy enclosure which is ideal for picnics. Visitors can park for 2 hours free of charge.

Oakham

Barnsdale Gardens

Voted the UK's Best Garden to Visit 2018/19, Barnsdale Gardens is a joy to visit whether you are a gardener or not. Famed as the home of the BBC Gardeners' World TV programme it has been dubbed ‘a theme park for gardeners' because of its uniquely designed collection of 38 individual, yet realistic, small gardens that guide you around this 32,000sq m site.

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Oakham

Barnsdale Gardens

barnsdalegardens.co.uk


Voted the UK's Best Garden to Visit 2018/19, Barnsdale Gardens is a joy to visit whether you are a gardener or not. Famed as the home of the BBC Gardeners' World TV programme it has been dubbed ‘a theme park for gardeners' because of its uniquely designed collection of 38 individual, yet realistic, small gardens that guide you around this 32,000sq m site.

Our garden areas range from traditional English cottage gardens, to wildlife, Japanese and French, as well as ample spaces for growing vegetables and fruit. Our focus is on environmental and ecological gardening, so we use organic and peat-free principles.

To maximise the Garden's educational potential there are courses and events running throughout the year. Our Summer Sundays take place during July and August and events are free participation once in the Gardens. On a lovely sunny day, with the wide variety of birds found in the Gardens singing away there is no need to rush, as you ticket allows you to be here all day.

Our Chelsea Flower Show, Gold Medal-winning plant nursery will tempt you to take home a little piece of green-fingered magic, while our Tea Room serves locally sourced, freshly prepared food to feed and revitalise you.

Oakham

Hambleton Hall

With a history dating back to 1881 and the longest-retained Michelin star in the country, Hambleton Hall offers a quintessential English country-house hotel experience - sophisticated yet deeply comfortable classic interiors and 17 individually decorated bedrooms. Plus, each season brings its own joys here, wander the lakeside grounds in summer and drink wine by our roaring fires in winter.

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Oakham

Hambleton Hall

hambletonhall.com


With a history dating back to 1881 and the longest-retained Michelin star in the country, Hambleton Hall offers a quintessential English country-house hotel experience - sophisticated yet deeply comfortable classic interiors and 17 individually decorated bedrooms. Plus, each season brings its own joys here, wander the lakeside grounds in summer and drink wine by our roaring fires in winter.

We've held our Michelin star since 1982, consistently offering top-quality menus of contemporary English cooking, produced by our head chef Aaron Patterson and his team. Much of our produce is grown in the kitchen garden and bread is made at our own Hambleton Bakery. Gourmands can also enjoy exploring our extensive wine cellar on a tour led by our sommelier, Dominique.

Walk off all that fine food and drink on the Fisherman's Track, a beautiful trail that runs from the hotel's grounds around the Hambleton Peninsula. The five-mile stroll takes in views of Normanton Church, Burley-on-the-Hill house, and the Finch's Arms pub where you can enjoy a warming brandy.

The south-facing terrace offers sublime views of the grounds and Rutland Water, or take a close look at The Parterre, our beautiful example of a formal garden.

Oakham

The Blue Ball Braunston

The Blue Ball is the type of country inn you always hope to find but too seldom do. The cosiest and oldest village pub in Rutland, it has been the place for welcome refreshment, warm hospitality and bountiful bonhomie since the 17th century.

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Oakham

The Blue Ball Braunston

theblueballbraunston.co.uk


The Blue Ball is the type of country inn you always hope to find but too seldom do. The cosiest and oldest village pub in Rutland, it has been the place for welcome refreshment, warm hospitality and bountiful bonhomie since the 17th century.

Take a little turn off the main Oakham to Leicester road and you’ll find us: we’re the handsome thatched-roof inn, opposite the church in the charming little village of Braunston. Pull up a chair in our wood-beamed bar and consult the menu, a choice of world wines, cask ales and fresh food, all fairly priced and cooked to order, with options for veggies and vegans, too.

We’re a pub for all seasons. Snuggle up by our roaring inglenook fireplace in winter, laze on our sun-trap deck in summer – and prop up the bar with the locals year-round. The Blue Ball is as popular with nearby villagers as visitors, which ensures it’s always filled with people and good cheer.

Oakham

The Olive Branch

Our characterful inn in tiny Clipsham has won the Rutland & Leicestershire County Dining Pub of the Year at the Good Pub Guide Awards almost every year since it reopened in 1999. That’s because we serve excellent food, local ales and inspired cocktails with warm hospitality.

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Oakham

The Olive Branch

theolivebranchpub.com


Our characterful inn in tiny Clipsham has won the Rutland & Leicestershire County Dining Pub of the Year at the Good Pub Guide Awards almost every year since it reopened in 1999. That’s because we serve excellent food, local ales and inspired cocktails with warm hospitality.

First opened as a pub in 1890, The Olive Branch was always at the heart of the village – and we still are. Come in and sit beside our open fire, prop up the bar with a sloe gin (concocted from local berries) or sip homemade lemonade in the garden overlooking Rutland’s tranquil fields.

Treat yourself to our innovative menu, which is packed with fresh, local, seasonal produce. Walk around our kitchen garden to see what might end up on your plate – we grow our own, as well as foraging for herbs, sourcing meat from local estates and seeking great cheeses from the Vale of Belvoir.

After dinner, stay the night. Snuggle into one of our six stylish, individually designed rooms in the adjacent Beech House, and wake to one of our slap-up breakfasts.

Oakham

Kings Arms

For a tasty meal and a pint of real ale, call by our traditional 17th-century inn, named ‘Best Pub in the Midlands’ by the Countryside Alliance in 2017. Dine on our award-winning cuisine, relax with a drink in a leather armchair by a roaring fire or out in our garden, and then snuggle up for the night in one of our cosy bedrooms

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Oakham

Kings Arms

thekingsarms-wing.co.uk


For a tasty meal and a pint of real ale, call by our traditional 17th-century inn, named ‘Best Pub in the Midlands’ by the Countryside Alliance in 2017. Dine on our award-winning cuisine, relax with a drink in a leather armchair by a roaring fire or out in our garden, and then snuggle up for the night in one of our cosy bedrooms.

Our talented team of chefs is dedicated to providing the finest food in the area. Whether you plump for wild woodland mushroom risotto, a steak or something delicious from our own smokehouse, you can be sure that what’s on your plate has been carefully selected from local sources and created in-house, right down to the ketchup. Our 17th Century Coaching Inn is set in the heart of the beautiful conservation village of Wing, great for exploring the surrounding villages and countryside.

Our bedrooms are restful places, set in old buildings around the pub, with attractive original features, including beamed ceilings, and traditional furnishings such as sleigh beds. Wake up to a hearty breakfast before exploring the local area: Oakham Castle, Melton Mowbray and Rutland Water Nature Reserve are just a few minutes’ drive away.

Stamford

Grimsthorpe Castle

Rising from the rolling folds of southern Lincolnshire, Grimsthorpe Castle is fit for a king. Quite literally: our handsome country estate, dating from the early 13th century, was once visited by Henry VIII. Thrones, furnishings and tapestries commissioned for subsequent monarchs are all here for you to admire.

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Stamford

Grimsthorpe Castle

grimsthorpe.co.uk


Rising from the rolling folds of southern Lincolnshire, Grimsthorpe Castle is fit for a king. Quite literally: our handsome country estate, dating from the early 13th century, was once visited by Henry VIII. Thrones, furnishings and tapestries commissioned for subsequent monarchs are all here for you to admire.

Henry granted Grimsthorpe to William, Baron Willoughby de Eresby, when the baron married Katherine of Aragon's lady-in-waiting in 1516. It has been lived in by the same family ever since. Feel that sense of history as you explore our quintessentially English castle, from King John's Tower, the oldest part, to the ornate state rooms and grand faade designed by Sir John Vanbrugh.

Outside, in our neat formal gardens, you will discover hidden corners (perfect for hiding away with a book) and you can stroll or cycle around the quiet, traffic-free trails that criss-cross the expansive parkland, where deer roam free. And after all that exertion, you'll need no excuse to tuck into a traditional cream tea in the historic surroundings of our Georgian Coach House.

Stamford

Burghley

William Cecil, the Lord High Treasurer to Elizabeth I, built Burghley House in the mid-16th century. In doing so he created one of the most fabulous homes of the British aristocracy, its 500 years of history preserved today as a stately home for a new generation to experience. Take a guided tour of this grandest of Elizabethan prodigy houses and relive the past. From the soaring vaulted ceiling and copper cookware of the Tudor Kitchen, to the Baroque opulence of the Heaven Room, the life's work of generations of the Cecil family slowly unfolds.

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Stamford

Burghley

burghley.co.uk


William Cecil, the Lord High Treasurer to Elizabeth I, built Burghley House in the mid-16th century. In doing so he created one of the most fabulous homes of the British aristocracy, its 500 years of history preserved today as a stately home for a new generation to experience.
Take a guided tour of this grandest of Elizabethan prodigy houses and relive the past. From the soaring vaulted ceiling and copper cookware of the Tudor Kitchen, to the Baroque opulence of the Heaven Room, the life's work of generations of the Cecil family slowly unfolds.

The pioneering travels of Lord Burghley's ancestors during the 1700s can be retraced through the treasures they amassed along the way, including one of the world's largest collections of 17th century Italian paintings. Memorabilia provides a fascinating insight into the lives of the family throughout the years, such as items from the 1924 Paris Olympics where the 6th Earl, David Cecil, competed in the 110-metre hurdles.

Explore the sweeping vistas of the grounds and gain a unique perspective on ‘Capability' Brown, the luminary of 18th century landscape design, and his reshaping of both the House and the Parkland in which it sits. Then take in the beauty and variety of the Gardens, with their impressive horticulture, artistic sculptures, and the excitement of youngsters as they splash and play in the fountains.

Uppingham

Uppingham Heritage Trails

Explore the small market town of Uppingham along our award-winning Heritage Trail. There are 20 identified sights on the Heritage Trail map, which can be viewed online/download a hard copy from our website, or you can pick up a copy of the Heritage Trail map leaflet from most outlets in Uppingham.

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Uppingham

Uppingham Heritage Trails

loveuppingham.org.uk


Explore the small market town of Uppingham along our award-winning Heritage Trail. There are 20 identified sights on the Heritage Trail map, which can be viewed online/download a hard copy from our website, or you can pick up a copy of the Heritage Trail map leaflet from most outlets in Uppingham.

The route, which takes 90-120 minutes to complete, begins in Uppingham Market Place. Here you'll find the first of seven information boards placed along the trail detailing stories from local history and culture. Our marketplace is host to an annual Fatstock Show, which has been held in Uppingham for more than 100 years, it is the only UK livestock event of its kind still held in temporary pens in a town's market place.

Along the way, you'll encounter other highlights, such as: the celebrated Uppingham School, famed for its music and arts, then there's Fossil Wall, an old town bastion, made from locally quarried limestone and full of the fossilised remains of bivalves, brachiopods and serpulids. It is the same stone that was used to build Peterborough Cathedral, just one of the unique finds uncovered by walkers of our trail.

Uppingham

Falcon Hotel

A handsome, honey-coloured coaching inn, The Falcon Hotel has stood in the heart of Uppingham's Market Place since the 16th century. Today, it offers visitors oak-beamed interiors, open fires and classic English hospitality.

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Uppingham

Falcon Hotel

falcon-hotel.co.uk


A handsome, honey-coloured coaching inn, The Falcon Hotel has stood in the heart of Uppingham's Market Place since the 16th century. Today, it offers visitors oak-beamed interiors, open fires and classic English hospitality.

In keeping with the best tradition of a historic coaching inn, the hotel offers travellers plenty of sustenance with a restaurant menu of traditional hearty British dishes, brasserie lounge with wood-burning fires and a cosy bar serving traditional ales.

Take afternoon tea here, a quintessential English tradition you can enjoy in the pretty hotel gardens when the sun shines. Plates of dainty finger sandwiches and stands of mini cakes and scones are served with jam and clotted cream, accompanied by a pot of tea or coffee - or a glass of Champagne if you're feeling indulgent.

Plus, if you're feeling energetic, we're just four miles from the nature reserves and water sports activities of Rutland Water.

Hitchin

The Farmhouse at Redcoats

In the countryside just beyond the Hertfordshire market town of Hitchin, you'll find our lovely Redcoats estate, which dates back to the 15th century. Now totalling 27 individually styled guest rooms, 12 in the original timbered Farmhouse and 15 in the newly renovated barn across the courtyard, there's a choice of places to sit and sample our locally sourced, field-to-fork food.

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Hitchin

The Farmhouse at Redcoats

farmhouseatredcoats.co.uk


In the countryside just beyond the Hertfordshire market town of Hitchin, you'll find our lovely Redcoats estate, which dates back to the 15th century. Now totalling 27 individually styled guest rooms, 12 in the original timbered Farmhouse and 15 in the newly renovated barn across the courtyard, there's a choice of places to sit and sample our locally sourced, field-to-fork food.

Book dinner in our elegant conservatory restaurant, take a seat in one of our private dining rooms, or relax in snug sitting rooms where you can enjoy an afternoon tea. Or just pull up a stool in our cosy old bar at the heart of the farmhouse, with gnarled old beams and a huge medieval fireplace. The newly renovated Cowshed bar and lounge is found across the courtyard, in our listed barn buildings, and specialises in whisky, gin and cocktails

With the personal, relaxed service you'd expect from one of our family-run Anglian Country Inns group, The Farmhouse at Redcoats is the perfect place for an accessible short break in the countryside. Less than an hour from London, we have four acres of gardens to explore, with rolling views across the Hertfordshire countryside.

Hitchin

The Fox at Willian

Our award-winning country pub and restaurant with rooms is a regular in the Top 50 Gastropubs and holds two AA rosettes. Call by our inn in pretty Willian, a village near Letchworth, to try the flavours combined by our talented team of chefs, eat breakfast, lunch or dinner. We've a wide selection of real ales to refresh you, too, including our own Brancaster Brewery brews as well as guest ales.

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Hitchin

The Fox at Willian

foxatwillian.co.uk


Our award-winning country pub and restaurant with rooms is a regular in the Top 50 Gastropubs and holds two AA rosettes. Call by our inn in pretty Willian, a village near Letchworth, to try the flavours combined by our talented team of chefs, eat breakfast, lunch or dinner. We've a wide selection of real ales to refresh you, too, including our own Brancaster Brewery brews as well as guest ales.

Our stylish yet relaxed modern restaurant serves locally sourced seasonal produce complemented by an impressive wine list. Or, if you fancy something lighter, pick from our great bar menu, featuring all the classics, elevated by a dash of characteristic Fox flair. On a warm day, eat in our lovely garden, which spills out onto Willian's pretty village green.

Fancy staying the night? We have eight rural-chic bedrooms, each decorated with contemporary furnishings, big cosy beds, powerful walk-in showers, plus tea and coffee facilities, high-spec TVs, wi-fi and air-conditioning. Country walks are right on our doorstep and you can bring the dog, too.

Hitchin

Hotel Cromwell

Steeped in history, our hotel was once the home of John Thurloe, secretary to Oliver Cromwell who helped prevent several Royalist plots to overthrow the government - hence the name. Fully refurbished in 2017, the hotel has lost none of this rich heritage, yet we've also added contemporary comforts the modern-day visitor will truly appreciate.

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Hitchin

Hotel Cromwell

cromwellstevenage.co.uk


Steeped in history, our hotel was once the home of John Thurloe, secretary to Oliver Cromwell who helped prevent several Royalist plots to overthrow the government - hence the name. Fully refurbished in 2017, the hotel has lost none of this rich heritage, yet we've also added contemporary comforts the modern-day visitor will truly appreciate.

Our handsome red-brick building in the heart of picturesque Stevenage Old Town, has been a significant landmark for centuries and has a long history as an important stopping point on the Great North Road. It remains a perfect place to recharge today.

Enjoy an aperitif in our oak-paneled bar with its Inglenook fireplace, then dine in Rump and Wade - our British brasserie offering traditional fare using locally sourced, seasonal ingredients and wine from our well-stocked cellar. You may wish to finish off the evening by sampling our unique beer brewed on site, ÒThe Lord CommanderÓ, before retiring to your individually designed bedroom, with bespoke, elegant furnishings for a restful night's sleep.

Hitchin

The Lytton Arms

A traditional real ale pub, the pretty Lytton Arms sits next to the historic Knebworth Estate, Hertfordshire's prime Tudor stately home and gardens. Our recent sympathetic refurbishment of the inn has ensured it's a supremely comfy place to eat and drink yet has kept its connections with the Lytton family history.

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Hitchin

The Lytton Arms

thelyttonarms.co.uk


A traditional real ale pub, the pretty Lytton Arms sits next to the historic Knebworth Estate, Hertfordshire's prime Tudor stately home and gardens. Our recent sympathetic refurbishment of the inn has ensured it's a supremely comfy place to eat and drink yet has kept its connections with the Lytton family history.

The original pub dates back to 1877 and was designed by the renowned English architect Sir Edwin Lutyens, brother-in-law of the Victorian novelist and playwright, Lord Lytton. This historic building has since been converted to a private home, next door to the current Lytton Arms.

Focusing on quality, wholesome meals made from local produce, our menus offer cracking curries, flavoursome fish, top-notch roasts and tasty puddings. We're a free house, so you can sample our 10 hand-pull range of cask ales plus bottled craft and other beers. If the weather's fine, take your drink into the garden overlooking open countryside and the adjoining Knebworth Estate - it's a great spot during Knebworth's summer musical festivals.

Hitchin

Hatfield House

Royal history is woven into this spectacular house, largely built by the 1st Earl of Salisbury on Hertfordshire’s largest private estate. Travel through time from the medieval Old Palace, childhood home of Elizabeth I, to the Victorian kitchen – built to prepare a feast for the Victoria’s first visit. A superlative example of a Jacobean interior, with its oak panels, ornate ceilings and black-and-white chequered floor, the Marble Hall is almost perfectly preserved. Look out for the Rainbow Portrait facing the entrance as you walk through – it is one of the most famous images of Elizabeth I.

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Hitchin

Hatfield House

hatfield-house.co.uk


Royal history is woven into this spectacular house, largely built by the 1st Earl of Salisbury on Hertfordshire’s largest private estate. Travel through time from the medieval Old Palace, childhood home of Elizabeth I, to the Victorian kitchen – built to prepare a feast for the Victoria’s first visit.

A superlative example of a Jacobean interior, with its oak panels, ornate ceilings and black-and-white chequered floor, the Marble Hall is almost perfectly preserved. Look out for the Rainbow Portrait facing the entrance as you walk through – it is one of the most famous images of Elizabeth I.

The extensive grounds include the Sundial Garden, with a unique Longitude timepiece, a newly commissioned Renaissance water sculpture and stone frieze of Elizabeth I. The private East Garden is designed to be viewed from the first floor of the House, and only opens to the public on Wednesdays during the visitor season. Our deer park, reinstated in the mid-1990s continues a tradition started in the 13th century. In Medieval times, deer were hunted for their meat – today, our ornamental fallow herd crops our grass.

Be sure to build in a stop for lunch at our River Cottage Kitchen & Deli, which is run in partnership with the food writer and campaigner Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. Or prefer a picnic somewhere in the grounds? Then pick up takeaway snacks and salads from the deli next door and head outside.

Hitchin

Knebworth House

Come to Knebworth and take a journey through 500 years of British culture and history. Home to the Lytton family for 19 generations, each of which has left its mark on the great estate, our Hertfordshire house, park and gardens has hosted some of the greats - from Charles Dickens to Winston Churchill to The Rolling Stones.

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Hitchin

Knebworth House

knebworthhouse.com


Come to Knebworth and take a journey through 500 years of British culture and history. Home to the Lytton family for 19 generations, each of which has left its mark on the great estate, our Hertfordshire house, park and gardens has hosted some of the greats - from Charles Dickens to Winston Churchill to The Rolling Stones.

Here, you can roam 250 acres of deer-grazed countryside, as well as the lawns, lime avenues and wood carvings in our formal gardens. You might also feel moved to play a little air guitar in our park - Knebworth is Britain's largest music venue, and more than 100 major artists have performed here since 1974.

Then lose yourself in the house itself, a Tudor-brick treasure now clad in the Victorian High Gothic style, courtesy of one-time owner Sir Edward Bulwer Lytton - the novelist famed for penning the immortal line: ÒIt was a dark and stormy nightÓ.

Admire the family heirlooms placed throughout the house, including the Jacobean Banqueting Hall and the Victorian Library, and try to work out where you've seen them before... The house and gardens have featured in numerous TV and movie productions, from The Crown to Paddington 2. Find out more about our roles on the silver screen at our new Film & TV Exhibition.

Hitchin

Mill Green Museum & Mill

Sitting pretty on the riverside in Hatfield, Mill Green is a working 18th-century watermill, where you can learn how flour is produced in the traditional way and buy a bag to take home. One of the few remaining water-powered corn mills still grinding flour, we’re open to visitors on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Sundays when you can see the beautiful old wooden cogs and wheels and millstones in action.

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Hitchin

Mill Green Museum & Mill

welhat.gov.uk


Sitting pretty on the riverside in Hatfield, Mill Green is a working 18th-century watermill, where you can learn how flour is produced in the traditional way and buy a bag to take home. One of the few remaining water-powered corn mills still grinding flour, we’re open to visitors on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Sundays when you can see the beautiful old wooden cogs and wheels and millstones in action.

Our museum is set in the former miller's house (dating back to the 16th century), home to three galleries filled with local artefacts. Here you can inspect treasures dating from Roman times to the present day. Children love playing with our traditional toys, dressing up in period costumes, and getting involved with craft demos. Plus, we have a programme of temporary exhibitions with themes that entice all ages, drawing on Hatfield’s local history and culture.

In fine weather, why not take a picnic down to the riverside, and enjoy our Jubilee Garden? Built to commemorate the Golden Jubilee of Elizabeth II, this modern formal garden has Tudor influences, a fragrant herb bed and colourful seasonal flowers.

Hitchin

Lawn House

Our quintessentially English B&B is set within the grounds of Hatfield House, Hertfordshire’s much-loved Jacobean estate. Our mix of modern and classic period furnishings – including some beautiful pieces from the attics of Hatfield House – contrast beautifully with the cool, contemporary palette of greys and blues, inspired by John Tradescant the Elder, an English naturalist and gardener at Hatfield House in the 1600s.

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Hitchin

Lawn House

lawn-house.com


Our quintessentially English B&B is set within the grounds of Hatfield House, Hertfordshire’s much-loved Jacobean estate. Our mix of modern and classic period furnishings – including some beautiful pieces from the attics of Hatfield House – contrast beautifully with the cool, contemporary palette of greys and blues, inspired by John Tradescant the Elder, an English naturalist and gardener at Hatfield House in the 1600s.

We’ve 15 individually decorated bedrooms for you to choose from, all en-suite. From our luxury suite to family rooms, standard doubles and twins, and our cosy single room, you can expect such design features as roll-top baths, and stone-mounted sinks with antique brass taps, along with plush linens and luxury toiletries. Most rooms have exceptional views across Hatfield’s gardens and parkland.

Breakfast is the event of the day, served in our pretty conservatory, featuring organic, freshly prepared dishes made from the finest, locally-sourced and home-grown ingredients; an added joy when taken in our pretty garden.

Hitchin

The Brocket Arms

The former monastic quarters of a Norman church provides an atmospheric setting for the Brocket Arms. Set in the historic Hertfordshire village of Ayot St Lawrence, our lovely 14th-century inn, with its low ceilings, oak beams and inglenook fireplaces, offers a warm welcome.

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Hitchin

The Brocket Arms

brocketarms.com


The former monastic quarters of a Norman church provides an atmospheric setting for the Brocket Arms. Set in the historic Hertfordshire village of Ayot St Lawrence, our lovely 14th-century inn, with its low ceilings, oak beams and inglenook fireplaces, offers a warm welcome.

Serving local ales and seasonal British food, the Brocket Arms has cosy pub-style dining rooms, and a large leafy garden, where children will discover a dedicated play area. Set around the inn's courtyard, our six en-suite guest rooms come with wrought-iron or four-poster beds, and décor in keeping with a traditional English country inn.

And, like any self-respecting historic country inn, Brocket Arms is believed to have a resident ghost. Legend has it that one of the monastery's priests was tried and hanged in the building during the Reformation, and there have been sightings of the affable character in the building ever since.

Hertfordshire history and heritage looms large in our little village and it's on our doorstep for you to explore. Ayot St Lawrence was the long-time home of playwright George Bernard Shaw (his house, Shaw's Corner, now belongs to the National Trust), while our other neighbour, the Georgian Ayot House was once famous for being Britain's only silk farm.

Hertford

Salisbury Arms

Part of Hertford’s hospitality scene since the 1600s, the Salisbury Arms Hotel has tended to the needs of both regular patrons and passing travellers for centuries. Our welcome is always warm, our food top quality, our beds comfortable. We’ve a snug bar, well-stocked wine cellar and the locally crafted real ales are served with a smile.

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Hertford

Salisbury Arms

salisburyarmshotel.co.uk


Part of Hertford’s hospitality scene since the 1600s, the Salisbury Arms Hotel has tended to the needs of both regular patrons and passing travellers for centuries. Our welcome is always warm, our food top quality, our beds comfortable. We’ve a snug bar, well-stocked wine cellar and the locally crafted real ales are served with a smile.

This handsome building, decorated with elegant white plasterwork, sits in Hertford’s historic centre, well-located for exploring the town and for escaping its bustle, too. Settle into a soft leather armchair under the old oak beams, a pint of local McMullen’s beer in hand. Or order a bite to eat – our menu changes with the seasons, ranging from sharing nibbles to lavish, homecooked suppers served in Cromwell’s restaurant.

Indeed, it’s said Oliver Cromwell once stayed at the Salisbury, while putting down a mutiny during the Civil War. You can still ascend the creaky Jacobean staircase that he would have used, though our rooms have moved with the times. These days you’ll find fresh furnishings, satellite TV, en-suite bathrooms, free WiFi and pillow menus.

Hertford

Tewinbury Farm Hotel

The Williams family has been farming at Tewin Bury since 1931. Today, we’re host to far more than our much-loved herd of dairy cows. Set in 700 acres of beautiful Hertfordshire countryside, Tewinbury Farm Hotel delivers a taste of country living, with luxury flair.

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Hertford

Tewinbury Farm Hotel

tewinbury.co.uk


The Williams family has been farming at Tewin Bury since 1931. Today, we’re host to far more than our much-loved herd of dairy cows. Set in 700 acres of beautiful Hertfordshire countryside, Tewinbury Farm Hotel delivers a taste of country living, with luxury flair.

Our 4 AA-star hotel and restaurant has grown out of the farm’s 17th-century buildings. The chicken shed is now home to the buzzing Williams Bar & Restaurant – open for hearty breakfasts, refined lunches and dinners, and lively Sunday lunches. While the Cowshed is the place to treat yourself to a champagne afternoon tea. The ultimate in chic rustic-luxury, Tewinbury’s bedrooms are characterised by wooden beams, exposed-brick walls, vaulted ceilings and four-poster beds.

The farm’s old red-brick stable, two barns and Millstream Suite, with its pagoda set alongside River Mimram, are popular spots for destination weddings and innovative business events, the last with views of the bird sanctuary, and water meadow beyond; just one Tewinbury’s classic Hertfordshire landscape views.

Hertford

The Black Horse

A traditional Local Free House, the family-run Black Horse was established in 1817 and we continue to be an integral part of Hertfordshire's food-and-drink scene. A multiple CAMRA award-winner for our wide range of fine cask ales, we're home to one of the largest beer gardens in the county, complete with a secure children's play area, which makes us a popular spot for families.

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Hertford

The Black Horse

theblackhorse.biz


A traditional Local Free House, the family-run Black Horse was established in 1817 and we continue to be an integral part of Hertfordshire's food-and-drink scene. A multiple CAMRA award-winner for our wide range of fine cask ales, we're home to one of the largest beer gardens in the county, complete with a secure children's play area, which makes us a popular spot for families.

Come and try one of our signature pies, game dishes or burgers, or book a table for Sunday lunch. And don't forget to check out our beer and wine list, which features new guest ales every week. In a rush? Order something from the newly opened Black Horse Bakery, which produces such legendary pies as our deep-filled venison, and steak, ale and mushroom.

We're one of the only pubs in Britain with a rugby team affiliated to the RFU, and a cricket team, too, so there's always something going on at the Black Horse, with live sports shown all weekend.

Hertford

Henry Moore Studio & Gardens

When Henry Moore and his wife fled London to Perry Green in 1940, Britain's most famous sculptor didn't just escape the Blitz he began to establish what would become England's most extraordinary sculpture exposition: 70 acres of rolling gardens and meadows filled with monumental semi-abstract works.

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Hertford

Henry Moore Studio & Gardens

henry-moore.org


When Henry Moore and his wife fled London to Perry Green in 1940, Britain's most famous sculptor didn't just escape the Blitz he began to establish what would become England's most extraordinary sculpture exposition: 70 acres of rolling gardens and meadows filled with monumental semi-abstract works.

As you meander through our unique landscape, notice how the iconic works of art come alive in their natural settings. Highlights include the huge bronze ‘Large Reclining Figure', which looms over grazing stock in the meadow below, and ‘Large Figure in a Shelter', the artist's final sculpture.

A guided tour of Moore's house, Hoglands, offers an insight into the lives of Henry and his wife, Irina. You can also delve into the workings of the sculptor's mind as you explore his studios. Here you'll discover treasures such as hundreds of fascinating maquettes, which show the origins of many of his most famous pieces.

Afterwards, enjoy a picnic in the grounds or a snack from our café and gaze over these unique sculpture gardens.

St Albans

St Albans Cathedral

Explore Britain’s oldest site of continuous Christian worship and England’s premier abbey – an ancient place of pilgrimage that has survived war, disaster and dissolution. Here, we tell the story of Saint Alban, Britain’s first saint, at the site of his shrine, which you can visit just as pilgrims and royalty have done throughout history.

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St Albans

St Albans Cathedral

stalbanscathedral.org


Explore Britain’s oldest site of continuous Christian worship and England’s premier abbey – an ancient place of pilgrimage that has survived war, disaster and dissolution. Here, we tell the story of Saint Alban, Britain’s first saint, at the site of his shrine, which you can visit just as pilgrims and royalty have done throughout history.

We’ve more tales to tell, too, such as the story of the rebel barons and clergy who held their first meeting here to discuss their grievances against King John, which led to the creation of Magna Carta in 1215. And there are intriguing things to see, including England’s only remaining wooden watching loft, from where monks and townspeople guarded the shrine, England’s longest nave, a spectacular medieval wall painting, and architecture that spans two millennia.

You’ll find a sense of peace at St Alban’s Abbey, just a stone’s throw from the city centre, whether you’re listening to the sound of the Cathedral choir or strolling through the surrounding parkland.

St Albans

Ye Olde Fighting Cocks

Sup a pint at our quintessential pub and you'll be drinking in England's oldest public house, according to Guinness World Records. This quirky inn, dating from 793 AD, now serves Cask-Marque local ales and is a regular winner of the Best Pub at St Albans Food & Drink Awards.

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St Albans

Ye Olde Fighting Cocks

yeoldefightingcocks.co.uk


Sup a pint at our quintessential pub and you'll be drinking in England's oldest public house, according to Guinness World Records. This quirky inn, dating from 793 AD, now serves Cask-Marque local ales and is a regular winner of the Best Pub at St Albans Food & Drink Awards.

As you sit, you can uncover Ye Olde Fighting Cocks' fascinating history. Signs on the walls spill some of our ancient secrets: Oliver Cromwell is said to have dined here in the 1600s, and, beneath your feet, underground tunnels stretch from the beer cellars to the Cathedral, apparently used as hiding places by monks in times of danger.

Low ceilings with original oak beams and an open fire lit on chilly days all combine to create a convivial atmosphere. Tuck into our award-winning classic English pub grub with a contemporary twist, including our own-recipe sausages with mash, sautéed brandy mushrooms, and fresh fish cooked in batter made using local ale. On warm days you can sit outdoors and enjoy a drink with a view of the old Roman town we call home and its grand cathedral.

Stamford

Stamford Town Trails

We're one of Britain's top places to live, according to The Sunday Times. And now we've made it easier for visitors to explore our gem of a traditional market town. Our new themed guided tours can be booked in advance and are led by Blue Badge tour guide Jill Collinge.

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Stamford

Stamford Town Trails

southwestlincs.com


We're one of Britain's top places to live, according to The Sunday Times. And now we've made it easier for visitors to explore our gem of a traditional market town. Our new themed guided tours can be booked in advance and are led by Blue Badge tour guide Jill Collinge.

‘Stamford and its Film Locations' and ‘Pride and Prejudice and Middlemarch' show why the town is beloved of costume-drama film-makers. We were England's first conservation area, so our historic sights are explored in the ‘Medieval Stamford' and ‘Georgian Delights' guided tours - while ‘Towers and Spires' will lead you to the churches whose distinctive silhouettes shape the town's skyline.

Or, request a tour tailored to your interests. Perhaps you'd like to hear about what lies below Stamford Town Hall, whose original dungeons were once an ancient house of correction? Be fascinated by the memorabilia tracing the Bull Run, a custom dating from King John's time that survived until 1839. Or learn more about Malcolm Sargent, widely regarded as Britain's leading conductor of choral works.

But whichever you choose, you'll take in streets of honey-coloured stone houses and winding alleyways, medieval churches, Georgian architecture and pretty market squares. Browse our independent shops and explore the water meadows. Finish in a cafe or historic wood-beamed inn offering locally sourced food. You might be lucky and catch our biennial Georgian Festival. What a quintessentially English spot to spend timeÉ

Selby

Townton Battlefield Society

In the 15th century, the House of Lancaster and the House of York clashed on a windswept plateau in a pivotal battle of the English Wars of the Roses. Today, the Battle of Towton is remembered and its impact explored near the site of the skirmish. Find out more at the Visitors’ Information Centre in the grounds of the Crooked Billet pub, near Saxton. Along with all the information you will need to visit the battlefield itself, we also display replica artefacts and give details about battlefield walks and evening talks, which run throughout the year at Saxton village hall.

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Selby

Townton Battlefield Society


In the 15th century, the House of Lancaster and the House of York clashed on a windswept plateau in a pivotal battle of the English Wars of the Roses. Today, the Battle of Towton is remembered and its impact explored near the site of the skirmish.

Find out more at the Visitors’ Information Centre in the grounds of the Crooked Billet pub, near Saxton. Along with all the information you will need to visit the battlefield itself, we also display replica artefacts and give details about battlefield walks and evening talks, which run throughout the year at Saxton village hall.

Walk the battlefield with an expert guide; our volunteers lead regular group walks that bring the brutality, strategy and progression of the battle to life with stories and historical facts. Along the way, you’ll also hear about the archaeological finds and fascinating legends and mysteries that have sprung up here since.

Learn to fire a longbow, a weapon integral to many historical English battles, with the Palm Sunday Archers. The group holds regular sessions – just turn up and our experienced archers will take you through your paces, with smaller, specially adapted bows available for children.